D-10-01: General Phytosanitary Import Requirements for Fresh Pepper and Tomato Fruit from the World

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Effective Date: March 23, 2016
(2nd Revision)

Subject

This directive outlines the phytosanitary import requirements for fresh tomato and pepper fruit into Canada.

The following changes have been made as part of this revision:

  • The phytosanitary requirements related to Tuta absoluta (tomato leaf miner) for fresh tomatoes and related to Thaumatotibia leucotreta (false codling moth) for fresh peppers have changed: options for pest free areas (PFA), systems approaches (SA), and treatment in the country of origin have been added.
  • The list of countries regulated for T. absoluta and T. leucotreta has been updated. See Appendix 1 for the list of affected countries.
  • For countries from which tomatoes or peppers are permitted, but where T. absoluta or T. leucotreta are not present, a plain phytosanitary certificate is now required; no particular additional declarations or treatment details are needed. See Appendix 1 for the list of affected countries.
  • Appendix 1 now provides specific lists of countries from which fresh tomatoes and fresh peppers are permitted. Importation from any other country requires prior approval from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

Table of Contents

Review

This directive will be updated as required. For further information or clarification, please contact the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

Endorsement

Approved by:

space
Chief Plant Health Officer

Amendment Record

Amendments of this directive will be dated and distributed as outlined in the distribution below.

Distribution List

  1. Directive mail list (Regions, PHRA, USDA)
  2. Provincial Government, Industry (determined by Author)
  3. National Industry Organizations (determined by Author)
  4. Internet

Introduction

The importation of fresh tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and pepper (Capsicum spp.) fruit is regulated by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to prevent the introduction and spread of plant pests that can cause significant economic and environmental damage to the Canadian plant resource base including agriculture, forestry and the environment. Phytosanitary import requirements for fresh tomato and pepper fruit are provided herein.

Scope

This directive is intended for use by those wishing to import fresh pepper or tomato fruit into Canada from other countries. This directive is also intended to aid the Canada Border Services Agency (CSBA) and foreign National Plant Protection Organizations (NPPO) in determining the import requirements for fresh tomato and pepper fruit entering Canada.

References

ISPM 4 - Requirements for the establishment of pest free areas. 1995, Rome, FAO.

ISPM 14 - The use of integrated measures in a systems approach for pest risk management. 2002. Rome, FAO.

Definitions, Abbreviations and Acronyms

Definitions for terms used in the present document can be found in the Plant Health Glossary of Terms.

1.0 General Requirements

1.1 Legislative Authority

The Plant Protection Act, S.C. 1990, c. 22
The Plant Protection Regulations, SOR/95-212
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Fees Notice, Canada Gazette: Part I (as amended from time to time)

1.2 Fees

The CFIA is charging fees in accordance with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Fees Notice. For information regarding fees associated with imported product, please contact the National Import Service Centre (NISC). Anyone requiring other information regarding fees may contact any local CFIA office or visit our Fees Notice Web Site.

1.3 Regulated Pests

Scientific name Common name
Thaumatotibia leucotreta False codling moth
Tuta absoluta Tomato leaf miner, South American tomato moth

The list of pests regulated by Canada does not include all existing organisms that potentially represent a plant health risk to Canada. When a new pest is found on or in association with plants or plant products, it will be categorized and added to the list as needed. The list of pests regulated by Canada can be found on the CFIA website.

1.4 Regulated Commodities

  • Capsicum spp., Fresh pepper fruit
  • Solanum lycopersicum, (syn. Lycopersicon esculentum), Fresh tomato fruit

1.5 Commodities Exempt

Processed pepper and tomato fruit (frozen, canned, dried, cooked, pureed, fermented, etc.)

1.6 Regulated Areas

All countries except the United States and Mexico.

2.0 Specific Requirements

2.1 Import Requirements

Country-specific import requirements may be obtained by consulting CFIA's Automated Import Reference System (AIRS).

Canada requires a pest risk assessment (PRA) prior to approving the importation of fresh tomato and pepper fruit from new source countries, or as part of a review of existing phytosanitary requirements. In situations where Canada determines that a PRA is required and there is a history of trade, Canada may allow trade to continue under existing conditions until the PRA is complete.

Consignments must originate from:

1) an approved country where NONE of the pests regulated by this directive are present (refer to section 2 for the phytosanitary import requirements),

or

2) an approved country where one or more of the pests regulated by this directive are present and which has implemented one of the following phytosanitary measures:

  1. Pest Free Area (refer to section 2.3.1); or
  2. Systems approach (refer to section 2.3.2); or
  3. Treatment (refer to section 2.3.3).

Consignments must be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate bearing the appropriate additional declaration, as specified in Appendix 2.

Consignments must be free of soil, regulated pests, leaves, branches, and plant debris.

Fresh pepper and tomato fruit from foreign countries entering Canada via a third country must meet the same phytosanitary requirements as consignments being imported directly into Canada. All consignments of plant products entering Canada are subject to inspection by the CFIA.

Note: Importing tomato and pepper fruit for re-packing may constitute a high risk activity that could negatively impact Canadian-grown products. Packing facilities adjacent to a place of production, or located in a tomato or pepper production area, should implement best management practices to prevent potential cross-infestation of Canadian crops by pests associated with foreign product. As per Section 5 of the Plant Protection Act, where a person becomes aware of the existence of a thing that the person suspects to be a pest in an area where the pest has not previously been known to exist, the person shall immediately notify the CFIA of the suspected pest and provide the CFIA with a specimen of it.

2.2 Countries free of pests regulated by this directive

Countries approved to export to Canada, and where pests regulated by this directive do not occur, must implement general surveillance measures for pests regulated by this directive and notify the CFIA should the pest status change.

A permit to import is not required. A phytosanitary certificate is required. Refer to Appendix 1 for the detailed requirements.

2.3 Countries where pests regulated by this directive are present

Countries approved to export to Canada, and where one or more pests regulated by this directive are present, may be approved for shipping to Canada provided they implement one of the following phytosanitary measures:

2.3.1 Pest Free Area (PFA)

A permit to import is not required. A phytosanitary certificate is required. Refer to Appendix 2 for the detailed requirements.

Tomato and pepper fruit originating from countries where pests regulated by this directive are present may be exported to Canada if produced in a CFIA-approved PFA.

The PFA must be established and administrated under the authority of the National Plant Protection Organisation (NPPO) of the country of origin in accordance with the criteria for establishing freedom from pests found in International Standard for Phytosanitary Measures (ISPM) 4, Requirements for the establishment of pest free areas. Additionally, consignments from a PFA transiting to a packinghouse or a port through an area not known to be free of regulated pests must be covered with an insect-proof mesh, screen or plastic tarpaulin or otherwise safeguarded from infestation by regulated pests.

The CFIA will review the protocols to establish and maintain pest-freedom submitted by the foreign country NPPO. The NPPO must demonstrate to the CFIA that the conditions of ISPM 4 are met.

2.3.2 Systems Approach (SA)

A permit to import is not required. A phytosanitary certificate is required. Refer to Appendix 2 for the detailed requirements.

Appendix 3 provides general guidance in the development of a SA for pepper and tomato fruit from countries where regulated pests to Canada are present.

Appendix 4 provides the minimum requirements of a SA for the export of fresh tomato fruit from countries where Tuta absoluta is present.

The use of a systems approach offers a preventative risk management alternative to mandatory phytosanitary treatment and is useful in situations where traditional phytosanitary inspection and certification may be considered ineffective or inefficient.

The integrated measures making up the systems approach may be applied throughout the supply chain, and include parties from the producer to the National Plant Protection Organization (NPPO).

As the NPPO of the importing country, the CFIA is responsible for setting and communicating technically justified phytosanitary import requirements to be addressed by the systems approach.

When the NPPO of the exporting country wishes to employ a systems approach, they will present a proposal to the CFIA. The NPPO must be able to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed provisions and should approve and oversee the places of production that use the integrated measures.

Tomato and pepper fruit from approved countries where regulated pests occur may be exported to Canada if produced in accordance with a CFIA-approved SA.

2.3.3. CFIA-Approved Treatments

A permit to import is not required. A phytosanitary certificate is required. Refer to Appendix 2 for the detailed requirements.

Fresh pepper and tomato fruit may be treated for regulated pests using CFIA-approved products and methods. Treatments currently approved by the CFIA can be found in Appendix 5. Equivalent treatment proposals will be evaluated by the CFIA upon request.

Note: As a signatory to the Protocol to the Vienna Convention on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (Montreal Protocol, 1987), Canada is phasing out the use of methyl bromide for quarantine purpose. Exporting countries are encouraged to submit data supporting the efficacy of alternatives to methyl bromide fumigation to the CFIA for review.

2.4 Non-Compliance

The CFIA will take appropriate actions against non-compliant consignments. The importer is responsible for any and all costs relating to inspection, and any costs associated with non-compliant product, including removal, return to origin, rerouting, treatment, disposal or any other measure deemed necessary by CFIA.

The CFIA will advise the exporting country's NPPO of any interceptions and of non-compliances. The discovery of quarantine pests during inspection in Canada or any other non-compliance may result in suspension of the importation of the commodity from that country and may require consultation with CFIA and remedial action at origin before shipping can resume.

Please refer to the CFIA policy directive D-01-06, Canadian Phytosanitary Policy for the Notification of Non-Compliance and Emergency Action, for more information.

2.5 Other Canadian Import Requirements

Other Canadian import requirements, which are in addition to those stated above, are outlined in separate Acts and Regulations. These Acts and Regulations include but are not limited to:

  1. Food and Drug Regulations,
  2. Licensing and Arbitration Regulations under the Canada Agricultural Products Act,
  3. Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Regulations under the Canada Agricultural Products Act, and
  4. Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act and Regulations.

It is the importer's responsibility to know and meet these requirements.

Questions and requests for information related to these import requirements should be directed to local offices of the CFIA.

3.0 Appendices

Appendix 1: Phytosanitary Import Requirements for Countries Approved to Export Tomato and/or Pepper Fruit to Canada

Country Approved Fruit Product:
Tomato
Approved Fruit Product:
Pepper
Belgium * checkmark
Brazil * X
Chile * checkmark
China X checkmark
Colombia * checkmark
Costa Rica * checkmark
Cuba checkmark checkmark
Dominican Republic checkmark checkmark
Egypt * checkmark
El Salvador X checkmark
Fiji X checkmark
France * X
Gabon X checkmark
Germany X checkmark
Guatemala checkmark checkmark
Guyana X checkmark
Honduras checkmark checkmark
India * checkmark
Israel * *
Italy * X
Jamaica X checkmark
Japan X checkmark
Montserrat X checkmark
Morocco * checkmark
Netherlands * checkmark
New Zealand checkmark checkmark
Nicaragua X checkmark
Panama X checkmark
Peru * checkmark
Portugal X checkmark
Seychelles checkmark X
South Africa X *
South Korea X checkmark
Spain * checkmark
Thailand X checkmark
Trinidad and Tobago X checkmark
Tunisia * checkmark
Turkey * X
United Kingdom * X
Vietnam X checkmark

Countries marked with a "checkmark" are deemed to be free of pests regulated by directive D-10-01 for the corresponding regulated commodity and are approved to ship that commodity to Canada. A phytosanitary certificate is required.

Countries marked with an "*" are reported to be infested by pests regulated by directive D-10-01 for the corresponding regulated commodity, either partially or in full, and are approved to ship that commodity to Canada, provided they meet the conditions listed in Appendix 2. A phytosanitary certificate is required.

Countries marked with a "Χ" are not approved to export tomato and/or pepper fruit to Canada.

Consignments from foreign countries entering Canada via a third country must meet the same phytosanitary requirements as consignments that are imported directly into Canada.

Consignments must be free from soil, regulated pests, leaves, branches, and plant debris.

Containers must be new or cleaned in a manner that addresses risks from regulated plant pests and removes all organic matter, soil and/or soil-related matter.

Other pests are regulated by Canada and could be associated with the commodities and/or articles regulated by this directive. A more comprehensive list of pests regulated by Canada can be found on the CFIA website.

Appendix 2: Phytosanitary Import Requirements for Countries Approved to Export Tomato and/or Pepper Fruit to Canada and Where One or More Pests Regulated by Directive D-10-01 are Present

Fresh tomato fruit (Solanum lycopersicum)
Countries where Tuta absoluta is present Requirements

Note: Only the treatment option (3) is approved for the following countries:

Belgium, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Egypt, France, India, Israel, Italy, Morocco, Netherlands, Peru, Spain (incl. Canary and Balearic Islands), Tunisia, Turkey, United Kingdom

An import permit is not required.

The consignment must:

  1. Originate from a pest free area based on official surveys conducted by the exporting country's NPPO. The exporting country's NPPO must issue a phytosanitary certificate with the following additional declaration for each consignment:

    "The consignment was produced in a pest free area for Tuta absoluta."

    or

  2. Be produced under a CFIA-approved systems approach as per Section 2.3, which meets the minimum requirements set in Appendix 3. The exporting country's NPPO must issue a phytosanitary certificate with the following additional declaration for each consignment:

    "The consignment was produced under a systems approach and was inspected and found free from Tuta absoluta."

    or

  3. Treated as per the treatment schedule outlined in Appendix 5. The exporting country's NPPO must issue a phytosanitary certificate. The details of the treatment must appear in the treatment section of the phytosanitary certificate.

Fresh pepper fruit (Capsicum spp.)
Countries where Thaumatotibia leucotreta is present Requirements

Note: Only the treatment option (3) is approved for the following country:

South Africa

Note: Only the pest free area option (1) and treatment option (3) are approved for the following country:

Israel

An import permit is not required.

The consignment must:

  1. Originate from a pest free area based on official surveys conducted by the exporting country's NPPO. The exporting country's NPPO must issue a phytosanitary certificate with the following additional declaration for each consignment:

    "The consignment was produced in a pest free area for Thaumatotibia leucotreta."

    or

  2. Be produced under a CFIA-approved systems approach. The exporting country's NPPO must issue a phytosanitary certificate for each consignment, with the following additional declaration:

    "The consignment was produced under a systems approach and was inspected and found free from Thaumatotibia leucotreta."

    or

  3. Treated as per the treatment schedule outlined in Appendix 5. The exporting country's NPPO must issue a phytosanitary certificate. The details of which must appear in the treatment section of the phytosanitary certificate or re-export phytosanitary certificate.

Numerous pests are regulated by Canada and could be associated with the commodities and/or articles regulated by this directive. A more comprehensive list of pests regulated by Canada can be found on the CFIA website.

Appendix 3: Guidelines for the Development of Systems Approach for the Export of Tomato or Pepper Fruit from Countries Where Pests Regulated by Canada are Present

The use of a systems approach offers a preventative risk management alternative to mandatory phytosanitary treatment and is useful in situations where traditional phytosanitary inspection and certification may be considered ineffective or inefficient.

The integrated measures making up the systems approach may be applied throughout the supply chain, and include parties from the producer to the National Plant Protection Organization (NPPO) of the exporting country. At least two of the measures must act independently.

As the NPPO of the importing country, the CFIA is responsible for setting and communicating technically justified phytosanitary import requirements to be addressed by the systems approach.

Integrated measures are generally developed and implemented by the NPPO of the exporting country for the production and export of materials which must meet the phytosanitary import requirements of Canada. When the NPPO of the exporting country wishes to employ a systems approach, they will present a proposal to the CFIA. The NPPO must be able to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed provisions and should approve and oversee the places of production that use the integrated measures.

End-point inspection may be used as part of the efficacy verification process, but should not be one of the independent measures of the systems approach. Measures employed in the systems approach should be primarily preventative rather than reactive.

The CFIA will evaluate the proposal for technical soundness and may make a variety of responses, including:

  • Accept the proposal.
  • Make recommendations to the NPPO for changes to the proposal.
  • Accept the proposal contingent on an on-site review and/or trial period.
  • Reject the proposal.

The CFIA's assessment of the proposed systems approach may include reviewing the system used by the exporting country's NPPO to approve places of production and to conduct audits. The CFIA may ask the NPPO of the exporting country to provide reports on audits undertaken in the exporting country.

The CFIA may audit the systems approach. These audits are intended to verify the effectiveness of the systems approach and may include documentation review, inspection of consignments and, if deemed necessary, site visits or any other activity which verifies the effectiveness of the systems approach.

The CFIA approves the system administered by the exporting NPPO. When the CFIA audits an individual facility, it is the systems approach administered by the NPPO which is being audited. The individual facility results may affect the acceptance of the systems approach administered by the NPPO.

A formal bilateral workplan may be developed to describe the technical details of the systems approach and to signal the CFIA's and exporting country NPPO's acceptance of the phytosanitary requirements.

General integrated measures

The NPPO of the exporting country may approve a place of production and/or a packing facility that complies with general integrated measures. The NPPO should register approved facilities, maintain a list of these facilities and provide the list to the CFIA upon request. The following elements should be considered by the NPPO as part of the approval process:

  • Up-to-date plan of the place of production.
  • Production, treatment, handling and storage records.
  • Access to a plant protection specialist with a well-established working knowledge of pest identification and control.
  • Designated contact person for communication with the NPPO of the exporting country.
  • Examinations of plant products and places of production by designated personnel as necessary, at appropriate times and according to information and protocols provided by the NPPO of the exporting country.
  • Records of examinations, including a description of pests found and corrective actions taken.
  • Specific pest risk management measures where necessary and documentation of these measures.
  • Notification of the NPPO of the exporting country if any pests regulated in the country of import are observed.
  • Establishment and documentation of a system of sanitation and hygiene.

Additional integrated measures in situations related to specific pests

In situations where general integrated measures alone are not sufficient to prevent the risk associated with the identified quarantine pests, the NPPO of the exporting country should consider additional integrated measures. The CFIA may require some or all of the following additional measures.

Place of production / packing facility manual

The NPPO of the exporting country should require that producers and packing facilities develop a manual. The manual should describe all of the requirements, elements, processes and operational systems that make up the integrated measures for pest risk management. The manual should be developed, implemented and maintained by the producer and approved by the NPPO of the exporting country.

Pest management program

The pest management program should describe procedures or processes approved by the NPPO of the exporting country and be designed to either prevent infestations or control pests. It should include a description of Canada's phytosanitary import requirements.

Plant protection specialist

A specialist with a well-established working knowledge of pest identification and control should be available to ensure that sanitation, pest monitoring and pest control measures are implemented as described in the manual.

Training of personnel

Personnel should be trained to detect pests, especially those regulated by Canada, and to follow a formal reporting system to communicate information on pest findings. Training should also include methods to handle material to reduce pest risk.

Examination of plants and plant products

Plants and plant products at the place of production / packing facility should be examined for the presence of specific pests on a regular schedule by designated personnel according to established methods, and corrective actions should be applied as necessary.

Packaging and transportation

Plants and plant products should be packed in a manner that prevents infestation by regulated pests.

Packaging material should be clean and free of pests, and meet the phytosanitary import requirements.

Conveyances used to move plants and plant products should be examined and cleaned as necessary prior to loading.

Each lot in a consignment should be identified in a way that can be traced back to the place of production and packing facility.

Internal audits

Internal audits should be conducted to ensure that the producer is in compliance with its manual. Internal audits should focus on whether the manual and its implementation meet the requirements of the CFIA.

If any critical non-conformity is detected, the NPPO must be notified and all exports to Canada from that facility must be suspended. Immediate corrective actions should be taken under the supervision of the NPPO of the exporting country. Exports may only resume when the NPPO determines that Canada's phytosanitary requirements are being met.

Records

Up-to-date records should be maintained and made available to the NPPO of the exporting country and to the CFIA upon request. The place of production's manual should clearly identify individuals responsible for maintaining various records, and the location and manner in which such records are maintained.

Responsibilities of the exporting country's NPPO

  • Communicate Canada's import requirements to registered producers and packers in the exporting country.
  • Develop and set up requirements for the integrated measures and systems approach program.
  • Approve and register places of production and packing facilities (if applicable).
  • Provide oversight of the systems approach program and conduct external audits, as required.
  • Carry out phytosanitary certification to attest that all plant products exported to Canada meet the CFIA's phytosanitary import requirements.
  • Upon request, provide the CFIA with information on the export program, including a list of registered facilities and notification of any suspensions.
  • Notify the CFIA of pest outbreaks and changes in pest status in the exporting country.
  • Facilitate CFIA site visits and audits.

Non-compliance and reinstatement

A. Individual facility

Non-compliances may be detected during internal audits, external audits, or as a result of examinations of plants and plant products. The place of production and/or packing facility should have its approval withdrawn and exports should be immediately suspended if the NPPO of the exporting country finds a critical non-compliance, identifies multiple (or repeated) non-critical non-compliances, finds that corrective actions are not completed within the specified time period, or receives a notification from Canada of an interception of a regulated pest on imported product.

Once an audit by the NPPO of the exporting country has confirmed that the non-compliance has been corrected, the NPPO should notify the CFIA of the facility's reinstatement. The corrective actions may require a change to the requirements of the systems approach and should include measures to prevent recurrence of the non-compliance identified.

An approved production site or packing facility that is not able to maintain the required phytosanitary conditions, does not implement corrective actions in a timely manner, or is found to be purposefully violating any condition of the systems approach will be advised in writing by the NPPO of the exporting country that their material no longer meets Canada's import requirements and their exports be suspended for the remainder of the shipping season.

B. Systems approach

Detections of regulated pests or repeated non-compliant shipments entering Canada may result in a suspension of the entire systems approach program by CFIA.

Appendix 4: Minimum Requirements for a Systems Approach for the Export of Tomato Fruit to Canada from Countries Where Tuta absoluta is Present

Fresh tomato fruit from countries where Tuta absoluta (tomato leaf miner) is known to occur and are approved to export to Canada may be imported provided the foreign country's National Plant Protection Organization (NPPO) and CFIA have agreed to a systems approach (SA) program to mitigate the risk of introducing this pest to Canada.

Foreign NPPOs are required to register production sites and packing facilities and verify that all the requirements outlined in this Appendix are met. Only those facilities meeting all these requirements may be registered and only those consignments meeting all these requirements may be certified for export to Canada under a SA. The International Standard for Phytosanitary Measures (ISPM) 14, The use of integrated measures in a systems approach for pest risk management, should serve as guidance in implementing the SA for the export of tomato fruit.

1.0 Requirements

The systems approach must include all of the following:

  • Tomato fruit must be imported as commercial consignments only.
  • Tomato fruit must be imported without vines, stems, or calyces.
  • Tomato fruit must be grown in pest exclusionary structures (PES), for example, greenhouses or screen houses that are registered with the national plant protection organization (NPPO) of the country of origin.
  • The PES must be equipped with double self-closing doors, and all vents or openings in the PES (other than the double closing doors) must be covered with 1.6 mm or smaller screening to prevent the entry of quarantine pests into the PES.
  • The PES must be equipped with pheromone baited traps for T. absoluta at a minimum rate of two traps per hectare or equivalent and with no fewer than two traps per PES for detection and monitoring.
  • All traps must be placed at least two months prior to harvest, maintained throughout the growing season, and monitored and serviced weekly.
  • The registered PES must be inspected by the NPPO or its designee throughout the growing season for evidence of T. absoluta. The NPPO must maintain trapping records of T. absoluta throughout the growing season for CFIA review.
  • If within 30 days of harvest two T. absoluta individuals are captured inside the PES or a single T. absoluta individual is found inside the fruit or in a consignment, then shipments from the PES will be suspended until CFIA and the NPPO determine that risk mitigation is achieved.
  • The NPPO must maintain a CFIA-approved quality control program to monitor or audit the program. A list of approved pest exclusionary structures should be provided to CFIA, and the NPPO must also notify CFIA when a PES is removed or added to the program. CFIA may conduct periodic site visits to monitor the program.
  • After harvest, tomato fruit must be safeguarded by an insect-proof mesh size 1.6 mm or smaller screen or plastic tarpaulin while in transit from the PES to the packinghouse and while awaiting packing.
  • Tomato fruit must be packed within 24 hours of harvest in a pest exclusionary packinghouse.
  • When the packinghouse processes tomato fruit for export to Canada, it must accept only tomato fruit from registered pest exclusionary structures.
  • For transit to Canada, tomato fruit must be packed in insect-proof cartons or containers or covered with insect-proof 1.6 mm mesh or plastic tarpaulin. These safeguards must remain intact until arrival in Canada. Otherwise, the consignment may be refused entry.
  • Each consignment of tomato fruit must be accompanied by either:
    • A phytosanitary certificate of inspection issued by the NPPO of the country of origin and bearing the following additional declaration: "The consignment was produced under a systems approach and was inspected and found free from Tuta absoluta.

      or

    • A re-export phytosanitary certificate accompanied by a copy of the phytosanitary certificate from the country of origin that includes the following additional declaration: "The consignment was produced under a systems approach and was inspected and found free from Tuta absoluta."

Appendix 5: Approved Treatments for Tomato and Pepper Fruit Pests Regulated by Directive D-10-01

1. Tomato Fruit

a. Methyl Bromide (MeBr) dosage rates and minimum concentration readings for fumigation against Tuta absoluta (in metric units).
Temperature MeBr Dosage rate
(g/m3)
Minimum concentration readings at:
0.5 hr (g)
Minimum concentration readings at:
hr (g)
21°C or above 48 43 33
b. Methyl Bromide (MeBr) dosage rates and minimum concentration readings for fumigation against Tuta absoluta (in imperial units).
Temperature MeBr Dosage rate
(lb/1,000ft3)
Minimum concentration readings at:
0.5 hr (oz)
Minimum concentration readings at:
hr (oz)
70°F or above 3 43 33

2. Pepper Fruit

a. Methyl Bromide (MeBr) dosage rates and minimum concentration readings for fumigation against Thaumatotibia leucotreta (in metric units).
Temperature MeBr Dosage rate
(g/m3)
Minimum concentration readings at:
0.5 hr (g)
Minimum concentration readings at:
hr (g)
26.5°C or above 24 19 14
21-26.4°C 32 26 19
15.5-20.9°C 40 32 24
10-15.4°C 48 38 29
4.5-9.9°C 64 48 38
b. Methyl Bromide (MeBr) dosage rates and minimum concentration readings for fumigation against Thaumatotibia leucotreta (in imperial units).
Temperature MeBr Dosage rate
(lb/1,000ft3)
Minimum concentration readings at:
0.5 hr (oz)
Minimum concentration readings at:
hr (oz)
80°F or above 1.5 19 14
70-79°F 2 26 19
60-69°F 2.5 32 24
50-59°F 3 38 29
40-49°F 4 48 38
Date modified: