Elements within the Nutrition Facts Table
Vitamins and Mineral Nutrients

The manner of determination of the vitamin content of a food, other than a formulated liquid diet, a human milk substitute or a food represented as containing a human milk substitute, is prescribed in section D.01.003 of the FDR.

Declarations of vitamins and mineral nutrients in the Nutrition Facts table are based on the combined total of both the naturally occurring nutrient content and any added nutrient content of a food. Vitamins and mineral nutrients are declared as total amounts and percentages of the Daily Value per serving of stated size [tables following B.01.401 and B.01.402, FDR].

Only those vitamins and mineral nutrients that are included in the tables Core Nutrition Information and Additional Nutrition Information are permitted to be included in the Nutrition Facts table.

Refer to Formulated Liquid Diets and Infant Formula sections for information pertinent to these specific types of food.

Vitamin A

The contribution of both retinol and its derivatives (e.g., retinyl acetate, retinyl palmitate) and beta-carotene is used to determine the total vitamin A content of a specific food based on the following conversions:

Source Ingredient Quantity Vitamin A Quantity Vitamin A Activity
1 µg All-trans retinol 1.00 µg RAE 3.33 IU
1 µg All-trans retinyl acetate 0.87 µg RAE 2.91 IU
1 µg All-trans retinyl palmitate 0.55 µg RAE 1.82 IU

Vitamin A content is calculated on the basis of micrograms of retinol activity equivalents (RAE) and expressed in micrograms (µg), based on the following formula [D.01.003(1)(a), FDR]:

total µg RAE = µg of retinol + (µg of beta-carotene ÷ 12)

International Units (IU) were formerly used to express the vitamin A content of a food. IUs are still used in some sections of the Food and Drug Regulations [e.g., Division 8 - Dairy Products, Division 9 - Fats and Oils, sections D.01.009, D.01.010 and D.01.011] to provide specifications on the standards of identity for certain foods and for controlling the level of vitamin A that may be added to foods. To convert IU of vitamin A into Retinol Activity Equivalents, the following formula is used:

1 µg RAE = 3.33 IU vitamin A

The following table may be used to convert IU of vitamin A to µg RAE.

Conversion Table for IU of Vitamin A to µg RAE
IU of Vitamin A µg RAE
50 15
100 30
150 45
200 60
250 75
300 90
350 105
400 120
450 135
500 150
550 165
600 180
650 195
700 210
750 225
800 240
850 255
900 270
950 285
1000 300

The following table may be used to convert µg RAE to % DV for vitamin A. Calculation of the % Daily Value is based on the Daily Values for vitamin A in Part 2 – Daily values for vitamins and mineral nutrients in the Table of Daily Values. Daily Values are given for different age groups. When using the table, be sure to use the appropriate column.

Conversion Table for µg RAE to % Daily Value (DV) for Vitamin A
µg RAE % DV
Foods solely for infants ≥ 6 months but < 1 year old Table Note 3
% DV
Foods for infants ≥ 6 months but < 1 year old
or
for children ≥ 1 year old < 4 years old Table Note 4
% DV
Any other case Table Note 5
10 2 3 1
30 6 10 3
40 8 13 4
50 10 17 6
100 20 33 11
150 30 50 17
200 40 67 22
300 60 100 33
400 80 133 44
500 100 167 56
600 120 200 67

Table Notes

Table Note 3

The Daily Value of vitamin A for foods intended solely for infants six months of age or older but less than one year of age is 500 µg RAE.

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Table Note 4

Rounding rules have been applied to these figures. The Daily Value of vitamin A for foods intended for infants six months of age or older but less than one year of age or for children one year of age or older but less than four years of age is 300 µg RAE.

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Table Note 5

Rounding rules have been applied to these figures. The Daily Value of vitamin A in any other case is 900 µg RAE.

Return to table note 5  referrer

Vitamin D

The contribution of ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) is used to determine the total vitamin D content of a specific food [D.01.003(1)(b), FDR]. Vitamin D is measured in micrograms (µg). It was formerly expressed in International Units (IU). IUs are still used in some sections of the Food and Drug Regulations [e.g., Division 8 - Dairy Products, Division 9 - Fats and Oils, sections D.01.009, D.01.010 and D.01.011] to provide specifications on the standards of identity for certain foods and for controlling the level of vitamin D that may be added to foods.

The amount of vitamin D may be calculated based on the following relationship:

1 µg of either ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) or cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) = 40 IU vitamin D

The following table contains IU of vitamin D converted to µg, along with a calculation of the % Daily Value of vitamin D. Calculation of the % Daily Value is based on the Daily Values for vitamin D in Part 2 – Daily values for vitamins and mineral nutrients in the Table of Daily Values. Daily Values are given for different age groups. When using the table, be sure to use the appropriate column.

Conversion Table for Vitamin D
IU µg Foods solely for infants ≥ 6 months but < 1 year old Table Note 6 % DV
Foods for infants ≥ 6 months but < 1 year old
or
for children ≥ 1 year old <4 years old Table Note 7
% DV
Any other case Table Note 8
4 0.1 1 1 1
8 0.2 2 1 1
16 0.4 4 3 2
24 0.6 6 4 3
32 0.8 8 5 4
40 1.0 10 7 5
60 1.5 15 10 8
80 2.0 20 13 10
100 2.5 25 17 13
140 3.5 35 23 18
180 4.5 45 30 23
200 5 50 33 25

Table Notes

Table Note 6

The Daily Value of vitamin D for foods intended solely for infants six months of age or older but less than one year of age is 10 µg.

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Table Note 7

Rounding rules have been applied to these figures. The Daily Value of vitamin D for foods intended for infants six months of age or older but less than one year of age, or for children one year of age or older but less than four years of age is 15 µg.

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Table Note 8

The Daily Value of vitamin D in any other case is 20 µg.

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Vitamin E

The amount of vitamin E expressed in milligrams (mg) is based on the content of d-alpha-tocopherol and dl-alpha-tocopherol and their derivatives [D.01.003(1)(c),FDR]. Alpha-tocopherol occurs naturally (d-alpha tocopherol or its synonym RRR-alpha tocopherol = natural vitamin E) or can be added as the synthetic form (dl-alpha-tocopherol or its synonym all racemic alpha-tocopherol = synthetic vitamin E). In addition, esterified forms (acetates, succinates of alpha-tocopherol) are used to increase the stability of the vitamin.

Vitamin E (mg) is calculated on the basis of the following:

1 mg d-alpha-tocopherol = 1 mg vitamin E
1 mg dl-alpha-tocopherol = 0.74 mg vitamin E

Vitamin E was formerly expressed in International Units (IU). IU are still used in sections D.01.010 and D.01.011 of the Food and Drug Regulations, controlling the level of vitamin E that may be added to foods. IU are calculated on the basis of the following:

1 IU d-alpha-tocopherol = 0.67 mg vitamin E

1 IU dl-alpha-tocopherol = 0.45 mg vitamin E

The following tables give conversions of IU of vitamin E converted to mg (for d-alpha-tocopherol and dl-alpha-tocopherol), along with a calculation of the percentage of the Daily Value of vitamin E. Calculation of the % Daily Value is based on the Daily Values for vitamin E in Part 2 – Daily values for vitamins and mineral nutrients in the Table of Daily Values. Daily Values are given for different age groups. When using the table, be sure to use the appropriate column.

Conversion Table for Vitamin E from IU of d-alpha-tocopherol
IU mg Table Note 9 % DV
Foods solely for infants ≥ 6 months but < 1 year old Table Note 10
% DV
Foods for infants ≥ 6 months but < 1 year old
or
for children ≥ 1 year old < 4 years old Table Note 11
% DV
Any other case Table Note 12
0.45 0.3 6 5 2
0.60 0.4 8 7 3
0.75 0.5 10 8 3
1.5 1.00 20 17 7
2.25 1.5 30 25 10
2.5 1.75 35 29 12
3 2.00 40 33 13
3.5 2.25 45 38 15
4 2.5 50 42 17
4.5 3.0 60 50 20
5 3.5 70 58 23
6 4.0 80 67 27
6.5 4.5 90 75 30
8 5.5 110 92 37
9 6.0 120 100 40

Table Notes

Table Note 9

Rounding rules for amounts of vitamin E in milligrams (mg) have been applied.

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Table Note 10

The Daily Value of vitamin E for foods intended solely for infants six months of age or older but less than one year of age is 5 mg.

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Table Note 11

Rounding rules have been applied to these figures. The Daily Value of vitamin E for intended for infants six months of age or older but less than one year of age or for children one year of age or older but less than four years of age is 6 mg.

Return to table note 11  referrer

Table Note 12

Rounding rules have been applied to these figures. The Daily Value of vitamin E in any other case is 15 mg.

Return to table note 12  referrer

Conversion Table for Vitamin E from IU of dl-alpha-tocopherol
IU mg Table Note 13 % DV
Foods solely for infants ≥ 6 months but < 1 year old Table Note 14
% DV
Foods for infants ≥ 6 months but < 1 year old
or
for children ≥ 1 year old < 4 years old Table Note 15
% DV
Any other case Table Note 16
0.45 0.2 4 3 1
0.60 0.3 6 5 2
0.75 0.3 6 5 2
1.5 0.75 15 13 5
2.25 1.0 20 17 7
2.5 1.25 25 21 8
3 1.25 25 21 8
3.5 1.50 30 25 10
4 1.75 35 29 12
4.5 2.00 40 33 13
5 2.25 45 38 15
6 2.5 50 42 17
6.5 3.0 60 50 20
8 3.5 70 58 23
9 4.0 80 67 27

Table Notes

Table Note 13

Rounding rules for amounts of vitamin E in milligrams (mg) have been applied.

Return to table note 13  referrer

Table Note 14

The Daily Value of vitamin E for foods intended solely for infants six months of age or older but less than one year of age is 5 mg.

Return to table note 14  referrer

Table Note 15

Rounding rules have been applied to these figures. The Daily Value of vitamin E for intended for infants six months of age or older but less than one year of age or for children one year of age or older but less than four years of age is 6 mg.

Return to table note 15  referrer

Table Note 16

Rounding rules have been applied to these figures. The Daily Value of vitamin E in any other case is 15 mg.

Return to table note 16  referrer

Vitamin C

The amount of vitamin C is based on the content of L-ascorbic acid and L-dehydroascorbic acid and their derivatives, calculated in milligram equivalents of L-ascorbic acid and expressed in milligrams.

Sodium erythorbate is permitted in a number of foods as a preservative. Erythorbate is not vitamin C as specified in D.01.003(1)(e) of the FDR. It is an inactive form that does not have the same physiological effect. However, it may show up as vitamin C in lab analysis if the lab is not making this distinction. CFIA labs can make this distinction when necessary, depending on the product in question. Vitamin C from erythorbate should not be declared in the Nutrition Facts table.

Thiamine

The amount of thiamine and its derivatives is based on the content of thiamine expressed in milligrams [D.01.003(1)(f), FDR].

Riboflavin

The amount of riboflavin and its derivatives is based on the content of riboflavin expressed in milligrams [D.01.003(1)(g), FDR].

Niacin

The amount of niacin and its derivatives is calculated in milligrams of nicotinic acid, plus the content of tryptophan, calculated in milligrams and divided by 60, with the total niacin equivalents (NE) expressed in milligrams [D.01.003(1)(h),FDR]. The conversion formula is as follows:

Total mg NE = mg niacin and/or nicotinic acid + (mg tryptophan ÷ 60)

The content of tryptophan in a food can be estimated if the protein content of the food is known. Tryptophan constitutes 1.5 percent of egg protein, 1.3 percent of protein from milk, meat, poultry or fish, and 1.1 percent of the protein from mixed and other sources [D.01.003(2), FDR].

Calculation Example - % of the Daily Value of niacin in a mixed protein source

A 60 g serving of food contains 4.26 mg of niacin and 7.5 g of protein from a mixed source:

NE in mg from niacin alone = 4.26 mg

  1. Calculate the amount of tryptophan (which is 1.1% of the protein)
    1.1% x 7.5 g protein = 0.082 g tryptophan = 82 mg
  2. Using the conversion formula above, divide mg of tryptophan by 60
    82 mg / 60 = 1.36 mg
  3. Add niacin equivalents expressed in mg from the niacin and the tryptophan
    4.26 mg+ 1.36 mg = 5.62 mg
  4. Calculate the % of the Daily Value of niacin (for children 4 years of age and older, and adults, Daily Value = 16 mg)
    5.62 mg/16 mg x 100% = 35.125 %DV
  5. Round the % of the Daily Value as per the table to B.01.402 of the FDR to arrive at the % Daily Value for declaration in the Nutrition Facts table
    35.125 % DV = 35 % Daily Value (rounded)

Vitamin B6

The amount of vitamin B6 is based on the content of pyridoxine, pyridoxal and pyridoxamine and their derivatives, calculated in milligram equivalents of pyridoxine and expressed as milligrams [D.01.003(1)(i), FDR].

Folacin or Folate

The amount of folacin or folate is based on the content of folic acid (pteroylmonoglutamic acid) and related compounds exhibiting the biological activity of folic acid, calculated and expressed in micrograms of dietary folate equivalents (DFE) [D.01.003(1)(j), FDR].

The terminology required to be used in the label declaration is "Folate" [item 23 of the table to B.01.402, FDR].

Vitamin B12

The amount of vitamin B12 is based on the content of cyanocobalamin and related compounds exhibiting the biological activity of cyanocobalamin, calculated in microgram equivalents of cyanocobalamin and expressed in micrograms [D.01.003(1)(k), FDR].

Pantothenic Acid or Pantothenate

The amount of pantothenic acid or pantothenate is based on the content of d-pantothenic acid and expressed in milligrams [D.01.003(1)(l), FDR]. Although pantothenate is also known by other names, e.g., vitamin B5, it must only be declared as "Pantothenate" or "Pantothenic Acid" [item 26 of the table to B.01.402, FDR].

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