Annex Z: Conditions Relative to BSE Controls

This page is part of the Guidance Document Repository (GDR).

Looking for related documents?
Search for related documents in the Guidance Document Repository

1.0 Introduction

The purpose of this annex is to describe the minimum standards that establishments must meet when producing ruminant meat products that would be eligible for export to the United States.

In order to meet the current import conditions of the United States, which are summarized below, the operator will have to develop and implement procedures to assure complete segregation of meat produced according to United States requirements to the satisfaction of the CFIA when both eligible and non eligible products are present on premises. The written segregation procedures should clearly outline the controls that will be implemented to ensure that applicable requirements are met so that eligible products can be distinguished from non eligible products at all times. The procedures must be acceptable to the inspector in charge and must include monitoring, verification and record keeping activities, deviation procedures and be auditable and effective.

1.1 Definitions

For the purpose of export to the United States, the following definitions apply.

Bovine: Bos taurus, Bos indicus and Bison bison.

Meat

  1. The part of the muscle of any cattle, sheep, swine, or goats which is skeletal or which is found in the tongue, diaphragm, heart, or esophagus, with or without the accompanying or overlying fat, and the portions of bone (in bone-in product, such as T-bone or porterhouse steak), skin, sinew, nerve, and blood vessels which normally accompany the muscle tissue and that are not separated from it in the process of dressing. As applied to equines this term has a comparable meaning.
    1. Meat does not include the muscle found in the lips, snout, or ears; and
    2. Meat obtained with advanced recovery methods (MRM) may not include significant portions of bone, including hard bone and related components, such as bone marrow, or any amount of brain, trigeminal ganglia, spinal cord, or Dorsal Root Ganglia (DRG).

Note: meat as defined also includes dressed carcasses, half-carcasses, quarters, boneless meat and bone-in cuts.

Meat by-product

Any part capable of use as human food, other than meat, which has been derived from one or more cattle, sheep, swine, or goats. This term, as applied to products of equines, shall have a comparable meaning.

Meat food product

Any article capable of use as human food which is made wholly or in part from any meat or other portion of the carcass of any cattle, sheep, swine, or goats, except those exempted from definition as a meat food product by the Administrator in specific cases or by the regulations in part 317 of this sub-chapter, upon a determination that they contain meat or other portions of such carcasses only in a relatively small proportion or historically have not been considered by consumers as products of the meat food industry, and provided that they comply with any requirements that are imposed in such cases or regulations as conditions of such exemptions to assure that the meat or other portions of such carcasses contained in such articles are not adulterated and that such articles are not represented as meat food products.

This term, as applied to food products of equines, shall have a meaning comparable to that provided in this paragraph with respect to cattle, sheep, swine, and goats.

Note: These terms, as applied to products of bison, shall have a meaning comparable to that provided in this paragraph with respect to cattle.

Offal (APHIS definition): the inedible parts of a butchered animal that are removed in dressing, consisting largely of the viscera and the trimmings, which may include, but are not limited to, thymus, pancreas, liver, heart, kidney, intended for use other than for human consumption (e.g., pet food manufacturing, technical use, rendering).

Specified Risk Material (SRM) as defined by the USDA-FSIS includes: the brain, skull, eyes, trigeminal ganglia, spinal cord, vertebral column (excluding the vertebrae of the tail, the transverse processes of the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae and the wings of the sacrum) and dorsal root ganglia of bovines 30 months of age and older, and the tonsils and the distal ileum of all bovines.

Note: Please also refer to section 11.6.3.2 Specific BSE Requirements (Beef tongues) for more information on removal of tonsils when tongues are intended for export.

2.0 Eligible products and specific import requirements

2.1 Meat products derived from bovines exported for human consumption

Any meat product derived from bovines (including veal) is considered eligible provided it does not contain or is not derived from specified risk material (SRM - as defined by the USDA-FSIS) or from mechanically separated beef. Annex A-1 must be used.

Notes:

  1. Mechanically Separated beef (MSM - beef) is prohibited by FSIS.
  2. Advanced Meat Recovery (AMR) must not include dorsal root ganglia, even when produced from meat derived from animals aged less than 30 months. The registered establishment wanting to export AMR must have a Quality Assurance program that ensures compliance with FSIS requirements. The FSIS requirements include such things as calcium content, iron content (as a measure of the presence of bone marrow), and the absence of Central Nervous System (CNS) and CNS-like tissue. The operator should consult the Federal Register Vol. 69, No. 7, to include the requirements in their Quality Assurance program. This product should not be referred to as Finely Textured Meat. If it is not labelled clearly as AMR, the export certificate should bear a mention stating that it is meat obtained from an AMR system.

2.1.1 Beef products derived from non-ambulatory bovines exported for human consumption

Non-ambulatory disabled cattle as defined by FSIS ("that cannot rise from a recumbent position or that cannot walk, including, but not limited to, those with broken appendages, severed tendons or ligaments, nerve paralysis fractured vertebral column or metabolic conditions". [This definition includes cattle that are non-ambulatory due to an acute injury on route to the establishment, during unloading, or anywhere on the premises.]) are banned from slaughter in Canadian registered establishments eligible for export to the United States. Such cattle cannot enter the slaughter facility and must, if on the premises and alive, be humanely handled until they are euthanized. For humane reasons, any non-ambulatory cattle on the premises of a registered establishment eligible to export to the United States must be euthanized on site.

2.2 Meat products derived from ovines and caprines destined for human consumption

Only meat product derived from animals less than 12 months of age is eligible. Age determination is to be based on dentition. Ovine or caprine animals which have a permanent incisor erupted through the gum are considered to be 12 months of age or above and products derived there from are not eligible for export to the United States. Annex A-2 must be used.

2.2.1 Specific requirements

The requirements described below are designed to meet the following objectives:

  1. to prevent cross contamination between eligible and non eligible products during slaughter, cutting/boning and processing;
  2. to ensure that age determination of animals is performed as required; and
  3. to enable verification of compliance with applicable requirements relating to BSE.
2.2.1.1 Requirements for slaughtering operations

Operators must have a written procedure in place that will ensure appropriate segregation of eligible and non-eligible products. If the operator intends to slaughter both animals aged under 12 months and 12 months and above, the slaughter operations of ovines or caprines aged 12 months or above must be done at the end of the production day or on a separate day.

Operators are required to develop and implement written procedures to identify the carcasses of ovines or caprines aged 12 months and above, and to maintain the identity of these carcasses from the point at which the age is determined until the products are packaged and appropriately labelled or the carcass is removed from the area/plant.

These procedures must include:

2.2.1.1.1 Examination of the incisor teeth of each carcass at or before the head inspection station.

2.2.1.1.2 Application of a mark or device to clearly identify the head and carcass sides (and quarters or parts as needed) of all ovine or caprine determined to be aged 12 months or older based on the examination of the dentition.

2.2.1.1.3 Complete segregationFootnote 1 of the carcasses and parts of ovines or caprines aged 12 months or older during chilling.

2.2.1.1.4 Recording of the number of slaughtered ovines or caprines aged 12 months or older at the point where the age is determined, followed by reconciliation of the number of carcasses and parts entering and leaving the chiller, either to go for cutting/boning, packaging, or to depart the facility. In the latter case, the receiving plant must be notified of the number of intact carcasses/sides or parts to be expected.

2.2.1.1.5 Labelling of packages containing carcasses/sides or parts derived from ovines or caprines aged 12 months or above in a manner that will easily distinguish them from packages containing meat derived from ovine or caprine under 12 months of age.

2.2.1.2 Requirements for cutting/boning operations

Operators may choose to cut/bone only carcasses from animals under 12 months. In this case, they are required to develop and implement written receiving procedures insuring only carcasses from animals under 12 months are received and processed. All carcasses from animals 12 months and above or carcasses for which there is a doubt as to the age must be refused and immediately shipped out of the cutting/deboning area/plant.

Operators may also choose to cut/bone both carcasses from animals aged under 12 months and 12 months and above. In this case, they are required to develop and implement written procedures to identify the carcasses and cuts of ovines or caprines aged 12 months or older and to maintain the identity of the product issued from these carcasses. These procedures must include:

2.2.1.2.1 Complete segregationFootnote 1 of the carcasses of ovines or caprines aged 12 months or above at reception.

2.2.1.2.2 Cutting/boning of carcasses of ovines or caprines aged 12 months or above at the end of the production day, on a separate day or, subject to controls acceptable to the inspector, on a separate line with separate equipment.

2.2.1.2.3 Labelling of boxes containing meat derived from ovines or caprines aged 12 months or above in a manner that will easily distinguish them from boxes containing meat derived from ovines or caprines under 12 months of age.

2.2.1.2.4 Segregated storage and handling of boxes containing meat derived from ovines or caprines aged 12 months or above.

2.2.1.3 Requirements for other processing operations

Operators may choose to process only meat derived from animals under 12 months. In this case, they are required to develop and implement written receiving procedures insuring only boxes or meat from animals under 12 months are received and processed. All boxes of meat from animals 12 months and above or boxes for which there is a doubt as to the age must be refused and immediately shipped out of the processing area/plant.

Operators may also choose to process both meat from ovine or caprine animals aged under 12 months and 12 months and above.

In this case, they are required to develop and implement written procedures to identify the meat of ovines or caprines aged 12 months or older and to maintain the identity of the product issued from these carcasses. These procedures must include:

2.2.1.3.1 Complete segregationFootnote 1 of the boxes of ovine or caprine meat cuts or products aged 12 months or above at reception.

2.2.1.3.2 Processing of ovine or caprine meat products from animals aged 12 months or above at the end of the production day, on a separate day or, subject to controls acceptable to the inspector, on a separate line with separate equipment.

2.2.1.3.3 Labelling of boxes containing meat products derived from ovines or caprines aged 12 months or above in a manner that will easily distinguish them from boxes containing meat products derived from ovine or caprine under 12 months of age.

2.2.1.3.4 Segregated storage and handling of boxes containing meat products derived from ovines or caprines aged 12 months or above.

2.2.2 CFIA verification

CFIA inspection staff should routinely verify the accuracy and/or effectiveness of operator's implementation of control measures designed to meet the additional USDA requirements:

2.2.2.1 Implementation of the operator's quality assurance program applicable to the prevention of cross-contamination and the required segregation between eligible and non eligible product.

2.2.2.2 Implementation of the operator's quality assurance program applicable to age determination.

2.3 Edible tallow

Tallow is eligible for export subject to meeting the conditions as described in Annex A-3.

2.4 Ruminant casings (derived from bovines or sheep)

These products can be exported with Annex C if they meet the specified requirements. Please note that age requirements outlined in 2.2 above apply to casings.

2.5 Imported meat products derived from bovine, ovine, caprine animals

Products imported from the United States or other countries eligible to export to Canada can be used in the manufacturing of products destined to the United States. See Annex Q for applicable FSIS requirements.

The operator must develop and implement written procedures to identify and maintain the identity of the eligible imported meat products. These procedures include:

  1. Segregation procedures between eligible and non eligible product during receiving, cutting/boning, other processing, packaging and labelling.
  2. Appropriate record-keeping to ensure traceability between eligible imported products and exported products.

The annex corresponding to the exported product must be used.

2.5.1 CFIA verification

CFIA inspection staff should routinely verify the accuracy and/or effectiveness of operator's implementation of control measures designed to meet the additional USDA requirements:

2.5.1.1 Implementation of the operator's quality assurance program applicable to the prevention of commingling between eligible and non eligible product.

2.5.1.2 Implementation of the operator's quality assurance program applicable to the traceability of eligible product from receiving to shipping.

2.6 Bovine meat food products for human consumption

Definition of meat food products: Products destined for human consumption that contain bovine, ovine or caprine meat products and that are under the jurisdiction of FDA (e.g., food that contains less than 3% of raw meat or 2% of cooked meat such as soup mixes, closed face sandwiches, etc.). The USDA/APHIS no longer requires an annex to be issued for bovine meat products.

Note: At this time, only meat food products derived from bovines may be exported.

2.7 Cervid meat for human consumption

There are no special BSE-related APHIS requirements for these products.

(Note: this type of product falls under the jurisdiction of the FSIS when the product (e.g., ground cervid meat) contains 2% or more of pork).

2.8 Products not for human consumption derived from bovines, ovines, caprines and cervids

Refer to section 11.7.3.4.3.

2.9 Transit of ovine or caprine meat products

Ovine or caprine meat products must meet all the APHIS VS, 9CFR 94.18 eligibility requirements for export to the United States. See requirements on applicable annex. Annex A-8 must be used.

2.9.1 Specific requirements

These requirements described below concern over-land transit in the United States of meat products derived from ovines and caprines:

  1. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), Veterinary Services (VS) have established conditions under which meat products derived from ovines and caprines, will be allowed to transit through the United States.
  2. The products that will be allowed to transit are those that would be accepted for import into the United States under APHIS supervision. These products will require a Transit Permit issued by APHIS to a United States entity.
  3. The National Center for Import and Export (NCIE) will accept applications for Transit Permits for products that are currently permitted for entry into the United States. The shipment will not be required to go to an Import Establishment or I-House.
    1. The shipment must be exported from the United States within seven (7) days of its entry.
    2. The commodities are not trans-loaded while in the United States.
    3. A copy of the import permit required is presented to the inspector at the port of arrival and the port of export in the United States.
  4. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Customs and Border Protection (CBP) will verify the following:
    • The shipment comes from a Canadian facility that is approved by USDA/Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) to export to the United States. (Any shipper that is listed on a Veterinary Import Permit would meet this condition).
    • The Permittee or their agent presents the Import Permit, the corresponding supplementary attestation required by APHIS from the Canadian Government and other applicable documents to CBP.
    • If the Permittee or their agent is requesting "transportation and exportation" (T&E) of the shipment to a foreign country and has met all requirements of CBP for such movement then the shipment will be allowed to transit the United States without inspection at the FSIS I-House.
Date modified: