Annex G: Procedures for Handling In Bond Shipments

This page is part of the Guidance Document Repository (GDR).

Looking for related documents?
Search for related documents in the Guidance Document Repository

1. Introduction

Commercial transport of bonded meat products may occur through Canadian ports of landing or exit. These shipments, although remaining under Customs bond, are regulated under authority of the Meat Inspection Act. This section provides the procedures and requirements for entry of "in bond" meat shipments into Canada.

1.1 Definitions

In bond shipments: for the purposes of these procedures, imported shipments of meat products moving to inland Canada under customs bond.

Imported meat products: shipments of foreign origin that enter Canadian territory for any purpose.

1.2 Categories of Imported Bonded Meat Products

In Transit

These are shipments that move from one foreign country to another, through Canadian territory under customs bond. These shipments may be stored in Canada, for a period of time, in bonded or sufferance warehouses, until they are removed from the country. These shipments must meet Animal Health requirements for entry into Canada and are regulated under the authority of the Meat Inspection Act and Regulations. Since these products are not intended for commerce in Canada, they will not be required to comply with Canadian compositional standards or labelling requirements. Shipping containers must be marked with (at a minimum) the name of the product and the name and address of the manufacturer.

In transit bonded shipments include:

  1. United States to United States (Alaska);
  2. United States to a foreign country; and
  3. Foreign countries to the United States.

The procedures for handling each type of shipment are described in sections 3.1 to 3.3 of this annex.

Canadian Destinations

Meat products imported into Canada as the final destination for commercial purposes may move inland to bonded or sufferance warehouses registered under the Meat Inspection Act and Regulations. Here they await in bond until the duties are paid or are sold as "duty free" to ships anchored in Canadian ports, for use as food for passengers and crew or to members of the public in duty free shops located at border crossings, ports or airports. These shipments must comply with all of the Canadian requirements for imported meat products including compositional standards and labelling. Bonded shipments to Canadian destinations include:

  1. duty free shops located on Canadian territory;
  2. bonded warehouses on Canadian territory (ship and airline supplies); and
  3. direct delivery cruise ship supplies.

The procedures for handling each type of shipment are described in sections 3.4 to 3.6 of this annex.

2. Legal Basis

There is no provision under the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act, the Meat Inspection Act (MIA) and the Meat Inspection Regulations, 1990 (MIR), for the CFIA to delegate the responsibility over the control of imported meat products to any other Canadian Government Agency, including the Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA). For this reason, the CFIA must exercise control over these shipments in the manner similar to all other commercial importations.

The goal of the CFIA's control over in transit meat product shipments is to assure that meat product shipments allowed to enter Canadian territory originate only from countries recognized by the CFIA as free from all reportable diseases, and that they are removed from the country and do not enter into the general commerce in Canada. See the list of reportable diseases in Canada.

With respect to in bond meat product shipments originating in the United States, the MIR subsections 3.(5) and 3.(6) provide the Director, Meat Programs Division (MPD) of the CFIA with powers to create separate inspection procedures as well as to designate locations where these measures are to be conducted.

The CFIA has created specific procedures for import control of meat products from the United States to be delivered directly and just in time to cruise ships anchored in Canadian harbors, due to the uniqueness of the business (see section 3.6 of this annex). The import control and inspection procedures were created under the authority of sub-section 3 (6) of the MIR, which states:

"Spot checks or similar verifying measures, including any such measures conducted at the border and including any unloading requirements, may be conducted in respect of a meat product that is imported into Canada from the United States by an Inspector, at facilities designated by the Director."

For exempted meat products, please see section 10.2.4. of the CFIA Meat Import Control Program, Chapter 10 of the Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures (MOP). Please note that under the Health of Animals Act and Regulations there are no exemptions for the importation of meat and meat products in Canada. All products containing meat, no matter the percentage, must originate in designated countries and must be accompanied by an Official Meat Inspection Certificate (OMIC).

3. Clearance of In Bond Shipments

3.1 In Transit Shipments to and from the United States

In the absence of animal or public health emergencies within the United States, generally the meat products of United States origin are considered to be of low risk, both from the public and animal health points of view. Under these conditions, United States origin meat products moving to another part of the United States through Canadian territory may be cleared by the CBSA officers upon receipt of acceptable proof that the products are indeed of United States origin. They do not need to be referred to the CFIA.

During animal or public health emergencies within the United States the CFIA may place restrictions on entry of certain specific meat and meat products from the United State to Canada. Please consult the current conditions for importation of meat products from the United States in the MOP, Chapter 10, Annex A.

3.1.1 Restrictions Applicable in Case of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in the United States

Any and all importations of meat and meat products from countries classified by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) as controlled risk countries for BSE must comply with the following paragraph. Shipments of meat and meat products derived from animals of the sub-family Bovinae (e.g. cattle, bison and buffalo) and things containing such meat and meat products and from animals of the species Capra hircus (goat) or Ovis aries (sheep) must be accompanied by an Official Meat Inspection Certificate specifying that the animals were slaughtered by a BSE slaughter process. A BSE slaughter process means any process for slaughtering an animal other than a process in which the animal is subjected, before slaughtering, to (a) a stunning process in which a device is used to inject compressed air or gas into the animal's cranial cavity; or (b) a pithing process involving laceration, after stunning of the animal, of the animal's central nervous tissue by means of an elongated rod-shaped instrument that is introduced into the animal's cranial cavity;
and
the deboned skeletal muscle meat does not contain mechanically separated meat;
and
the products were not contaminated with i) distal ileum of all ages of bovine animals, and, ii) palatine tonsils, the skull including the brain, trigeminal ganglia and eyes, the spinal cord and the vertebral column, (excluding the vertebrae of the tail, the transverse processes of the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae, and the wings of the sacrum) from all bovine animals aged 30 months or older.

3.1.1.1 the CFIA Designated Border Crossings for Isolated Communities in the United States in case of BSE
  1. Point Roberts, Washington
    Entry into Canada: Pacific Highway Crossing, British Columbia
    Exit from Canada and re-entry into the United States: Point Roberts, Washington
  2. Angle Inlet, Minnesota
    Entry into Canada: Sprague, Manitoba
    Exit from Canada and re-entry into the United States: Sprague, Manitoba
  3. Delta Junction, Alaska
    Entry into Canada: Abbotsford and Pacific Highway, British Columbia
    Exit from Canada and re-entry into the Unites States: Alcan, Alaska
3.1.1.2 CBSA Control Procedures Due to BSE in the United States:

The requirements of the CBSA Memorandum D3-4-5 issued in Ottawa, March 10, 2000 on the subject of Highway Cargo stipulates, "In-Transit Movements" shall be applied.

This memorandum requires that movements of goods from one point to another in the United States in-transit through Canada are permitted by the United States-Canada Transit Manifest, Form 7512-B Canada A8B.

At the point of entry into Canada, the Customs Inspector reviews and validates all copies of the Form 7512-B Canada A8B by stamping and initializing each copy at the bottom of the form. The original copy is kept in the pending file and the others are given to the driver. The original copies are kept in the pending file until acquittal is received from the United States customs office of re-entry. Acquitted copies are filed.

At the point of entry into Canada, the goods are sealed with green ball seals that must remain intact until they are removed by United States customs at the office of re-entry.

The commercial carriers are only permitted to cross at the designated ports, identified in section 3.1.1.1 of this annex. In addition, the entire loads must remain in the United States. The meat products will not be permitted to travel through Canada back to the United States.

The United States customs officer stamps the remaining copies of Form 7512-B Canada A8B. One copy is retained, one is returned to the driver and one is sent to the CBSA office at the first point of entry to Canada.

In the case of the community of Angle Inlet, Minnesota, there is no permanent presence of customs on either side of the Canadian or United States border. Therefore, the CBSA office in Sprague will provide the acquittal for the Form 7512-B Canada A8B upon return of the carrier from the United States community. The commercial carrier will be required to stop at the CBSA office in Sprague on the return trip and will be required to surrender the three copies of the Form 7512-B Canada A8B and supporting documentation in the form of a signed invoice, delivery slip or similar form, to show proof of entry of the shipment into the United States.

The CBSA office, at the first point of entry to Canada, sends copies of all acquitted copies of the Form 7512-B Canada A8B issued for goods entering into Canada under this CFIA exemption from importation restrictions to the National Import Service Center (NISC) (fax: 1-905-795-9658).

The CBSA office will also notify the CFIA of all transactions for which no confirmation was received that the goods did re-enter the United States.

3.1.1.3 CFIA Control Procedures In Transit to and from the United States Due to Animal Health Restrictions

The CFIA shall retain the copies of the acquitted manifests and records of any infraction investigations. The CFIA shall cooperate with the CBSA in investigation of all infractions under this exemption from import restrictions. Confirmed infractions may lead to cancellation of the designation of the community by the CFIA.

3.2 In Transit Shipments - from the United States to Third Countries

These are the United States exports of meat products to countries other than Canada being moved through the Canadian territory. Being of United States origin, in the absence of animal or public health emergencies within the United States, these meat products are considered to be of low risk, both from the public and animal health points of view. These shipments may be cleared by the CBSA officers upon receipt of acceptable proof that the products are indeed of United States origin. They do not need to be referred to the CFIA.

During animal or public health emergencies within the United States, the CFIA may place restrictions on entry of certain meat and meat products from the United States to Canada. Refer to the current conditions for importation of meat products from the United States (MOP, Chapter 10, Annex A, United States). The appropriate Animal Health attestations listed in Annex A, applicable to the meat product in transit through Canada must be certified by an official veterinarian of the United States Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). The attestations may be made on the export certificate issued to the foreign country or on official United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) letterhead. In either case the attestations must have specific reference to the in transit product.

3.3 In Transit Shipments - Third Countries to the United States

These are generally the shipments of meat products that are being imported to the United States, from countries other than Canada. These shipments land in a Canadian port and continue by road or rail, through Canadian territory, to their final destination in the United States.

These shipments could pose risk in Canada, both from public and animal health point of view and consequently must be referred to the CFIA for clearance, by the CBSA officers, before they are allowed to enter Canadian territory.

The shipments are cleared by the NISC. The importer/broker must provide a copy of the official meat inspection certificate issued by the competent authority of the country of origin for export to the United States. At the same time the importer/broker must also provide the following information:

  1. name of the Canadian port of landing;
  2. name of the ship and the voyage number;
  3. date and time of arrival;
  4. name and location of the Storage warehouse (if applicable);
  5. border crossing into the United States;
  6. date and time of exit from Canada; and
  7. animal health attestations for Canada (if applicable).

The NISC will clear shipments after the above information is received and it is determined that the country of origin and commodity is eligible for entry to Canada and the applicable animal health attestations required by Canada are certified by an official veterinarian of the exporting country on official foreign government letterhead. The attestations may be made on the foreign export certificate issued to the United States or on official letterhead of the foreign veterinary authority. In either case the attestations must have specific reference to the in transit product.

When a country or commodity is not eligible for entry to Canada, the importer must apply for an animal health import permit prior to the shipment arriving in Canada.

3.4 Duty Free Shops Located on Canadian Territory (Border Crossings, Ports, Airports)

Imported meat product shipments destined to these shops must be handled as any other imported meat product shipments intended for commercial purposes in Canada.

3.5 Ship and Airlines Supplies, Bonded Warehouses

Meat products imported by bonded businesses, located on Canadian territory, engaged in supplying ships anchored in Canadian waters or airplanes landed in Canadian airports, or any other foreign mode of transport on the Canadian territory, must be handled as any other imported meat product intended for commercial purposes in Canada.

3.6 Cruise Ships Supplies Provisions for In Bond, Direct, Just in Time Delivery

This procedure applies only to the direct and just in time deliveries of United States or Canadian origin meat products, from the United States, to cruise ships anchored in Canadian harbours. Canadian origin meat products need not be processed in the United States to qualify for FSIS certification for export. These shipments, intended as provisions for passengers and crew of the cruise ships, must be delivered directly and just in time from the United States / Canadian border to a designated cruise ship facility. This policy does not apply to any other type of ship or to ship supplies to bonded warehouses located on Canadian territory, as indicated under 3.5.

3.6.1 Designated Cruise Ship Facilities

Meat shipments certified for direct, just in time delivery to cruise ship must be delivered directly to the CFIA designated cruise ship facilities:

  • Port of Vancouver, Canada Place Terminal
  • Port of Vancouver, Ballantyne Terminal
  • Port of Victoria, Ogden Point
  • Port of Montreal, Iberville Terminal, Old Port sections 3 & 5
  • Port of Quebec City, Quebec Passenger Terminal Sections 21 & 22
  • Port of St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Piers 10, 11 & 17

Other cruise ship terminals may be considered by the CFIA for addition to the designated facilities list, providing there is a valid need, significant volume, suitable staging area and the CFIA resources are available to conduct the necessary inspections.

Requests for additional designated facilities may be submitted to:

National Manager, Food Imports
Ottawa, ON K1A 0Y9
Tel.: 613-773-6139
Fax: 613-773-5603

3.6.2 Certification Requirements

Import of meat products for direct and just in time delivery to cruise ships must be duly certified by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), using the Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) Form 9135-3. Documentation standards and clearance procedures may be found on the USDA web site.

These shipments must be cleared by the CFIA before they are allowed to enter Canadian territory following regular import procedures. Refer to Annex C of this chapter.

Canadian requirements with respect to labelling and composition of meat products of United States or Canadian origin, imported from the United States for direct delivery to cruise ships are waived providing they are in compliance with United States labelling and compositional requirements. The following statement must be present on FSIS Form 9135-3:

"The Canadian requirements for meat products composition and label registration have been waived. The meat product covered by this certificate is intended for direct and just in time delivery to cruise ships anchored in Canada."

"Les produits de viandes visés par le présent certificat sont exemptés des exigences canadiennes en matière de composition et d'enregistrement de l'étiquette. Ils sont destinés à être livrés directement et juste à temps à des paquebots de croisière mouillant dans des ports canadiens."

These products must be accompanied by the original of a duly filled in FSIS Form 9135-3, with the exception of label registration number, which may be omitted. For the required certification statement see section 3.3 of this annex. These meat products must comply with all other CFIA requirements for meat products imported from the United States. CFIA inspectors will conduct spot check inspections of the imported meat products, at the time of transfer of the meat products from transport containers to the ships.

Canadian meat products previously exported to the United States can be certified for export on the form FSIS 9135-3.

All pallets of meat products for direct and just in time cruise ship deliveries shall be clearly marked with a placard with the words "Cruise Ship Exemption".

Meat products from United States establishments under a Canadian intensified inspection status are not permitted to be certified for export.

During animal or public health emergencies within the United States, the CFIA may place restrictions on entry of certain specific meat and meat products from the United States to Canada. Please consult the current conditions for importation of meat products from the United States, Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures (MOP), Chapter 10, Annex A, United States.

Shipments of meat and meat products derived from animals of the sub-family Bovinae (e.g.: cattle, bison) and from animals of the species Capra hircus (goat) or Ovis aries (sheep) of United States origin, transported to cruise ships anchored in Canadian harbors, for direct and just in time delivery do need to be accompanied by an OMIC (FSIS 9135-3) declaring that the animals were slaughtered in accordance with a BSE slaughter protocol, as outlined above.

3.6.3 NISC clearance

Cruise Ship meat shipments must be cleared for entry into Canada by the NISC. The Import control and Tracking System (ICTS) will not assign an inspection. Following entry into Canada, the importer or representative must forward all original certificates to the NISC "Request for Release" form.

For cruise ship direct delivery shipments, the importer/broker must provide the following additional information, at the time of NISC clearance:

  1. date of entry into Canada;
  2. name of the cruise ship line and the cruise ship;
  3. date and time of loading onto the cruise ship; and
  4. designated cruise ship facility where the loading is to take place.

The NISC will fax a copy of the cleared "Request for Release" cover sheet and the original certificate to the regional inspection office. The CFIA Inspector shall take the pertinent documents to the cruise ship facility. Copies of the original meat inspection certificate should be requested of any truck unloading meat products directly delivered from the United States.

3.6.4 Inspection procedures

Following entry into Canada, the meat products must be delivered directly to the cruise ships docked at the designated cruise ship facility (see 3.6.1).

Spot checks to verify product certification and condition will be conducted at random at the CFIA designated facilities, by the CFIA Inspectors. Each shipment delivered to a designated cruise ship facility must be accompanied by a copy of a duly signed FSIS certificate form 9135-3. This form must be made available to the CFIA Inspector upon request.

Observation of the condition of trucks, and products shipped upon arrival provides assurance that the conditions of transport have not compromised the wholesomeness of the certified products.

3.6.5 Inspection Criteria

All meat products delivered directly from the United States directly to cruise ship terminals under this cruise ship policy are required to be of United States or Canadian origin. Canadian meat products previously exported to the United States can be certified for export on the form FSIS 9135-3.

All shipping cartons must be identified with the United States (or Canadian) inspection legend.

All shipping cartons must be marked with the common name (product description) of the product.

The product common name (product description) must be listed on the meat inspection certificate.

All shipping cartons shall be marked with the certificate number (USDA/FSIS Export Stamp).

3.6.6 Inspection Decisions

Products which are not listed on United States inspection certificates and are not marked with a United States export stamp will be ordered to be removed from Canada.

Products which are not stamped but are clearly part of a certified shipment will be accepted providing the majority of the products on the shipment are stamped with the certificate number.

Products without inspection legends or common names on the shipping cartons will be opened and examined further. If inspection legends or product descriptions do not correspond with a meat inspection certificate the products will be ordered to be removed from Canada.

Products which arrived in unsatisfactory condition, based on evidence of damage, odour, stained or leaking containers will be ordered to be removed from Canada.

Date modified: