Shell Egg Manual - Chapter 7 – Packaging and Labelling

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Table of Contents

7.1 Objective

To ensure that shell eggs prepared in a Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) registered egg station or imported into Canada are packaged and labeled in a uniform manner and meet the requirements set out in the Egg Regulations, Food and Drug Regulations and the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Regulations.

7.2 References

Canada Agricultural Products Act
Egg Regulations
Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act
Consumer Packaging and Labelling Regulations
Food and Drugs Act
Food and Drug Regulations (FDR)
Industry Labelling Tool
Minimum Enforcement Guidelines for Nutritional Labelling - (Internal access only)
Nutrition Labelling Toolkit

7.3 Required Forms

Label Verification Forms - Appendix I and Appendix II

7.4 Definitions

Box: is a container made to contain 15 dozen eggs

Carton: is a container that is capable of being closed and that is made to contain not more than 30 eggs in separate compartments

Case: is a container made to contain 30 dozen eggs

Close proximity: means immediately adjacent, without any intervening printed, written or graphic matter.

Container: is any case, box, tray with an over wrap, carton, or other receptacle made to contain eggs

Label:

  • includes any legend, word or mark attached to, included in, belonging to or accompanying any food (Food and Drugs Act, section 2)
  • means any mark, sign, device, imprint, stamp, brand, ticket, or tag (Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act, section 2)

Prepackaged product: any food that is contained in a package in the manner in which it is ordinarily sold to, used by, or purchased by a consumer or by a commercial enterprise, without being re-packaged.

Principle Display Panel: includes the top of the lid on the outside of an egg carton, the top of a tray with an overwrap, or the side panels of the egg boxes or cases. The tops of boxes/cases are normally not considered part of the principle display panel.

Notes:

1. Plastic or metal, boxes and cases are exempt from labelling requirements when they contain completely labeled product, with all markings visible from the outside. When they contain loose pack eggs, with no over wrap, the product is to be fully marked in an acceptable manner.
2. Skids of loose pack eggs, such as those used to market surplus eggs to the egg processing industry, are considered single containers and are normally labelled with a tag attached to the skid.

7.5 Legislative Framework

The Egg Regulations provide for markings on egg containers and prohibit the use of terms implying that eggs are superior in quality to the grade marked on the container and also that containers are not to be marked with any word or words indicative of size other than the grade mark.

The Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act and Regulations provides a uniform method of labelling and packaging of consumer goods (product sold at retail). It prevents fraud and deception by providing for factual label information from which consumers can make an informed choice. It also requires the use of metric units of measurement, and bilingual labelling.

The Food and Drugs Act and Regulations prohibits the labelling, packaging, treating, processing, selling or advertising of any food (at all levels of trade) in a manner that would mislead or deceive consumers as to the character, value, quantity, composition, merit or safety of the product. As well, it prohibits health claims that might suggest that a food is a treatment, preventative or cure for specified diseases or health conditions. It also requires bilingual labelling for prepackaged products.

Section 18 of the Egg Regulations, 5(1) of the Food and Drugs Act and 7(1) of the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act are the sections which deal with the use of any false, misleading and erroneous statements applicable to egg containers. The Guide to Food Labelling and Advertising provides interpretations of the various regulations. The Guide is available at
Guide to Food Labelling and Advertising

In some provinces, the CFIA inspectors are mandated under a MOU (memorandum of understanding) to enforce provincial regulations. In most cases, provincial legislation mirrors the federal legislation so the standards for labelling and marking apply.

The egg claims and interpretations in this document are deemed to comply with the provisions set out in the Food and Drugs Act (FDA), the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act (CPLA) and the Canada Agricultural Products Act (CAPA).

7.6 Guiding principles for the development of Packaging and Labelling Policies on Egg containers

Egg packaging and labelling policies are developed with consideration of the following principles:

  • protection of health and safety
  • prevention of product misrepresentation and fraud
  • promotion of an informed choice, by providing consumers with reliable and comparable information that reflects current food technology and nutrition information that can be easily understood
  • support of market place equity and fair competition
  • respect for obligations under international, federal and provincial trade agreements

7.7 Packaging

7.7.1 Packaging Materials

There is a wide variety of packaging materials on the marketplace intended for packaging eggs. These include Styrofoam, plastic and fiber cartons, plastic and fiber trays, plastic over wrap bags, and other materials that come in direct contact with eggs (primary packages). In addition there are other packaging materials used to transport eggs, including fiberboard, plastic or wire baskets, wooden or plastic pallets & dividers, plastic wrap to secure shipments and other materials that do not come in direct contact with the eggs.

As a general requirement, packaging materials may not impart any undesirable substance to the eggs and are to protect the food product from contamination.

7.7.2 Condition of Packaging Material

All packaging material must be clean, dry, strong enough to protect the eggs and not have a deleterious effect on the eggs

Clean means the container is free of stain, dirt, residue of eggs, all markings, tags and staples previously applied

Dry means the container is not exposed to direct or indirect contact with moisture. A problem may occur if the containers make direct contact with water or the relative humidity is too high in the egg storage area or packaged product is moved from a cold area to a warm area. When problems do occur they are most notable where the packaging material is made of fibre which weakens when it becomes wet or where the egg is in direct contact with the container, any color in the fibre may migrate onto the egg shell.

Strong Enough to protect means the container will not give way under normal handling conditions. Problems will be identified by observing broken or leaking eggs that are created during normal handling. Examples where this could be found is where fiber containers have absorbed moisture or containers are no longer of sound construction as may occur with the re-use of boxes and cases.

Deleterious means the packaging material has caused the eggs to discolor or take on an odour foreign to that of a normal egg or are determined to be a risk to public health.

Cartons & fiber trays used to segregate eggs must be new for:

  • Canada A and Canada B grade eggs

Re-use of Packaging Material

  • boxes and cases may be re-used to pack Canada A and B grade eggs where they have never been used to pack ungraded or Canada Nest Run eggs. In addition they must still satisfy the requirements noted above for all packaging material.
  • plastic trays may be re-used after they are clean, sanitized and dried before eggs are packed on them or before conveying back to a producer.
  • used fiber trays may be used to pack Canada C or Canada Nest Run eggs if they are clean, provide adequate protection and do not have a deleterious effect on the eggs.

7.7.3 Inspection of Packaging Material

Frequency:
Assessment of packaging material will be made at the time of each inspection.

Records:
Depending upon the nature of the violation(s) a variety of reports may be used to record the violation and corrective action, and to verify that the corrective action was effective. Under normal conditions this will include a Notice of Detention and a Notice of Release from Detention but may also include other reports such as action plans or reports of analysis.

The records must indicate the non-compliance has been corrected or where compliance action is still in progress that the remaining non-compliant material remains under control.

These records are to be filed and maintained by the responsible inspector at the CFIA office. Copies of reports requiring the operator's signature will be provided to the operator.

Action to be taken on non-compliant packaging material:

  • Where the inspector has found egg containers that are dirty, stained, moist or not strong enough to protect the eggs and the eggs have not been adversely affected; the inspector should have the product re-packed.
  • Where these containers have no eggs in them, they should be dealt with in such a manner that they cannot be used for packing eggs.
  • Where the eggs are affected and no longer eligible for grading they are to be destroyed or identified as inedible. Each incident where the eggs are or may be affected must be dealt with on a case by case basis to determine if the eggs which do not show visible problems are suitable for human consumption or if the eggs designated as not fit for human consumption are suitable as a feed ingredient.
  • Where an inspector finds used cartons or fibre trays in an egg station they are to get an explanation, in writing, from the operator. A decision to allow them in an egg station will be based on what the regulations allow, otherwise the used cartons and/or fibre trays are to be removed from the egg station to ensure they are not used contrary to the regulations. In general, where containers are being re-used contrary to the regulations the inspector is to take action to restore compliance.

7.8 Labelling of Egg Containers

The Egg Program does not have a mandatory label review process, therefore formal CFIA approval is not required for egg labels. It is industry's responsibility to ensure that products and labels comply with established federal regulations and policies.

For a summary of labelling requirements, see appendices I and II.

7.8.1 Mandatory Markings

All containers of graded eggs must be labeled in accordance with all applicable federal and provincial legislation. All the mandatory markings on a container must be clearly legible, either printed, stamped or stenciled.

Questions and enquiries on egg labelling issues can be forwarded to a CFIA inspector. As a regulatory agency, the CFIA will provide compliance assistance to clients in the form of routine advice and guidance on inquiries about the requirements of the regulations and policies. Should an inspector require an interpretation of a possible infraction of the applicable Acts and Regulations, particularly related to nutrition claims, help can be obtained through consultation with the Area Egg Specialist or the Regional Manufactured Food Specialists.

The federal requirements for mandatory markings are as follows:

7.8.1.1 Bilingual Labelling

The Food & Drugs Act and the Consumer Packaging & Labelling Act state that all mandatory information as well as nutrient content claims on retail food labels must be shown in both official languages.

The province of Quebec has additional requirements concerning the use of French language on all products marketed within its jurisdiction. Information on these requirements can be obtained from the Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec (MAPAQ).

7.8.1.2 Common Name

Location

  • Cartons, and trays with an over wrap: Top
  • Boxes, cases and pallets with loose eggs: One of four sides

Minimum Type Size

  • Cartons, and trays with an overwrap: 3 mm
  • Boxes or cases: 13 mm

Language

  • The common name must be presented in both English eggs and French "œufs".

7.8.1.3 Grade Name

Location

  • Cartons, and trays with an over wrap: Top
  • Boxes, cases and pallets with loose eggs: One of four sides

Presentation

  • The grade name must conform to the official design as indicated in Schedule II of the Egg Regulations. Where eggs are graded A or B, this name must be shown inside the outline of a maple leaf.
  • The word Canada and the grade letter must be clear and legible.
  • Eggs imported into Canada must be marked with the foreign grade designation equivalent to the Canadian grade.

Minimum Type Size

  • Cartons, and trays with an overwrap:
  • Canada A and Canada B:
    • the word Canada: 1.5 mm;
    • the grade letter (Canada A): 3 mm
  • Canada C and Canada Nest Run: 1.5 mm.

Cases, boxes and pallets of loose eggs:

  • Canada A and Canada B:
    • the word Canada: 6 mm;
    • the grade letter (Canada A): 13 mm
  • Canada C and Canada Nest Run: 13 mm

Size Designation

Canada Grade A eggs require a size designation to be made in the following manner:

Position

  • The size designation for Canada A grade eggs (e.g. large, medium) must be marked in close proximity to the maple leaf.

Minimum Type size

  • Cartons, and trays with an overwrap: 3 mm.
  • Boxes, cases and pallets with loose eggs: 13 mm
Language: The size designation must be presented in both official languages:
English French
Jumbo Size Calibre Jumbo
Extra Large Size Calibre Extra gros
Large Size Calibre Gros
Medium Size Calibre Moyen
Small Size Calibre Petit
Peewee Size Calibre Très petit

Multiple Size Designation

In order to allow a supply of boxes to be used to pack the different sizes of eggs, it is permitted to have a check off system to identify the size of the eggs in the box. The eggs inside must all be of the same grade size.

7.8.1.4 Identity and Principle Place of Business

These requirements do not apply to loose eggs on pallets.

Requirements for cartons and trays with an overwrap:
Name and address of:
a) the registered egg station:

  • in which the eggs were graded and packed; or
  • for which the eggs were graded and packed; or

b) the wholesaler or retailer taking responsibility for the eggs packed in the carton or tray

Requirements for boxes and cases:
The name and principal place of business of the egg station or for whom the eggs were packed must be declared.

Location

  • Cartons, and trays with an over wrap: Any outside panel other than the bottom
  • Boxes and cases: One of four sides

Language

  • Although this information is mandatory, it is not required in both official languages. It can be in either English or French depending upon the language requirements in the province where the eggs will be sold.

Minimum Type Size

  • Cartons, and trays with an overwrap: 1.5 mm
  • Boxes and cases: 6 mm

Note: A website alone is not sufficient since not everyone has access to a computer and the internet.

7.8.1.5 Producer Premises Code (PPC)

Location

  • Cartons, and trays with an over wrap: Any outside panel other than the bottom
  • Boxes, cases and pallets with loose eggs: One of four sides

Note: The PPC is not required to be printed on the label when it is marked on the shell of every egg, if it is clearly visible to the consumer without having to open the container. (e.g. clear plastic cartons)

Minimum Type Size

  • Cartons, and trays with an overwrap: 1.5 mm
  • Boxes, cases and pallets with loose eggs: 6 mm

Requirement

  • Section 14.(1)(g) of the Egg Regulations requires that every container of eggs must be marked with a legible producer premises code. A maximum of six producers may be grouped on the same code, however fewer is recommended.

7.8.1.6 Net Quantity (Count) of Eggs

Location

  • Cartons, and trays with an over wrap: Top
  • Boxes, cases and pallets with loose eggs: One of four sides

Language

  • The quantity can either be displayed numerically or the words can be written out. (i.e. 12 or one dozen). Where the quantity is written out it must be presented in both official languages.

Minimum Type Size

  • Cartons, and trays with an overwrap: 1.5 mm
  • Boxes, cases and pallets with loose eggs: 6 mm

7.8.1.7 Storage Instructions

Where a Best Before Date is required (see 7.8.1.8), storage instructions must also appear.

Location

  • Cartons, or a tray with an over wrap: Any outside panel other than the bottom
  • Boxes, cases: One of four sides

Language

  • The instructions in both English Keep Refrigerated and French "Garder réfrigéré" are required. "Garder au froid" is also acceptable.

Minimum Type Size

  • Cartons, and trays with an overwrap: 1.5 mm
  • Boxes, cases: 6 mm

7.8.1.8 Best Before Date (also referred to as Durable Life Date)

Interpretation

The best before date is the date before which there has been no appreciable deterioration in the quality of the product since it was packaged and displayed for sale, providing that it is kept under satisfactory conditions. In other words, the eggs in the container are expected to meet the grade and size marked on the container until the end of the best before date. This date must be applied to all prepackaged foods with a shelf life of 90 days or less that are destined for retail sale.

Location

  • Cartons, and trays with an overwrap: Any outside panel other than the bottom
  • Boxes, cases: One of four sides

Note: The best before date is not required to be printed on the label when it is marked on the shell of every egg and is clearly visible to the consumer without having to open the container. (e.g. clear plastic cartons)

Minimum Type Size

  • Cartons, and trays with an overwrap: 1.5 mm
  • Boxes, cases: 6 mm

Requirement
The format for the best before date statement is as follows:

  • the statement best before must be shown grouped together with the actual date.
  • the month must be shown in words and may be abbreviated as shown below.
  • the day of the month must be shown after the month, and must be expressed in figures.

Language

  • All egg cartons must display the statement in both English best before and French "meilleur avant"
  • If the month is not abbreviated it must be presented in both French and English.
  • If it is abbreviated, the month of the best before date must be shown as follows, using a single abbreviation for both French and English:
  • A: January
  • FE: February
  • MR: March
  • AL: April
  • MA: May
  • JN: June
  • JL: July
  • AU: August
  • SE: September
  • OC: October
  • NO: November
  • DE: December

An example of an acceptable declaration is as follows:

Best Before / Meilleur avant
JN 28

7.8.1.9 Nutrition Facts Table

See section 7.8.2.1 for nutrition facts table requirements.

7.8.1.10 Registration Number

This requirement is not applicable to cartons or trays with an overwrap.

Location: One of four sides

Minimum Type Size: 6 m

7.8.1.11 Dye Mark

The words Dyed or "Teints" must appear on containers other than trays with an overwrap or carton, superimposed on the grade name when the eggs have been marked with a dye mark.

Language: In accordance with requirements of the province where the eggs are located

Minimum Type Size: 6 mm

7.8.1.12 Rejects

The words Rejects and "Rejetés" must appear on the label of containers, other than trays with an overwrap or cartons, of eggs that do not meet the requirements for a grade and will be sold as intact eggs for animal feed or purposes other than human consumption.

Language: Must be bilingual

Location: One of four sides

Minimum Type Size: 6 mm

7.8.1.13 Pasteurized Eggs

The words Pasteurized, "Pasteurisé", Graded Canada A before pasteurization and "Classé Canada A avant pasteurization" must appear on the label when the eggs have been pasteurized in their shell.

Language: Must be bilingual

Location:

  • Cartons, and trays with an overwrap: Any outside panel other than the bottom
  • Boxes, cases and pallets with loose eggs: One of four sides

Minimum Type Size:

  • Cartons, and trays with an overwrap: 1.5 mm
  • Boxes, cases and pallets with loose egg: 6 mm

7.8.2 Nutrition Labelling

All nutrition labelling information must accurately reflect the nutrient content of the product, which has been validated through appropriate analyses, and the information must remain accurate over the entire shelf life of the food.

In place of lab analysis to support nutrient values for regular eggs, it is perfectly acceptable for egg station operators to use the nutrient database (Appendix III) established by the Egg Farmers of Canada (EFC) for the generic Canadian egg. In the case of specialty eggs such as those claiming to be a source of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFA) or regular eggs with data different from EFC's nutrient values for a typical Canadian egg, the egg station operator is expected to substantiate the nutrient values through lab analysis.

Periodically the Egg Farmers of Canada, through continuous testing, will update their nutrient database and publish the results on their website.

Nutrition labelling on egg containers can be categorized into two sections, nutrition facts and nutrition claims.

7.8.2.1 Nutrition Facts Table (NFT)

All eggs sold in Canada are required to exhibit Nutrition Facts in a manner deemed acceptable under the Food and Drug Regulations. Nutrition labelling is the standardized presentation of the nutrient content of a food, based on a specific amount of food. All eggs must exhibit the nutrition facts in the form of the Nutrition Facts Table, the exception being products used in manufacturing other foods [See section 7.8.2.1(e)].

Interpretation and policies related to these regulations can be found in the CFIA's Guide to Food Labelling and Advertising. The following information under this section supplements information that can be found in the Guide and how it applies to the egg industry.

Imported eggs must bear the Canadian Nutrition Facts Table with the other country's nutrient data.

a) Nutrition Facts

The Nutrition Facts table ensures a consistent look that is easy for consumers to find and read. All of the information in the NFT is based on a specific amount of food, referred to as the serving size. For eggs, the serving size is 1 <size> egg. The NFT must include information on calories, and the 13 core nutrients. The 13 core nutrients must always appear in the same order within the table, even if the nutrient amount is zero. For further information please consult the Guide.

Language

The Nutrition Facts table must be presented in both official languages unless otherwise exempt from bilingual labelling. To minimize space taken up by the table the egg industry has generally used bilingual formats as opposed to using formats that require separate tables for French and English.

Nutrient Values for the Generic Canadian Egg

The Egg Farmers of Canada (EFC) has developed nutrient data for different sized eggs, see Appendix III. These values are permitted for use on generic egg cartons, but cannot be used on labels of eggs that have had their nutrient content modified via feed.

Health Canada also maintains a database of nutrients in foods called the Canadian Nutrient File. For shell eggs, the information in this database is based on the testing performed by EFC to update their own nutrient analysis table; therefore the most current information for the nutrient content of a generic egg should be what EFC has posted.

b) Rounding Rules

The nutrition regulations have very specific requirements on the rounding of values in the Nutrition Facts table. Details can be found in the Food and Drug Regulations (Tables to B.01.401 and B.01.402) or chapter 6 (Tables 6-1 and 6-2) of the Guide to Food Labelling and Advertising.

c) Presentation of Nutrition Facts Table on Egg Cartons, Boxes and Trays

Note: The Nutrition Labelling Toolkit is a very good tool for the development of the Nutrition Facts table, and should be consulted for in-depth information on this subject.

In general, the NFT must be displayed on 15% or less of the available display surface and it must appear on one continuous surface.

The available display surface (ADS) is the surface of the egg container that is available to support labelling information. The ADS is usually determined by numerical calculation.

The first step in determining the appropriate format of the nutrition facts table is to calculate the available display surface.

The ADS includes:

  • For traditional cartons: top, 2 ends, front and back and may include the inside of lid if any information, such as nutritional or promotional, is printed on it.
  • For boxes/cases: the 4 Sides and Top (visible portion after closing boxes).
  • For trays with an overwrap: Top and Bottom (when the container can be turned over without damaging the eggs)

In the case of most cartons, the available display surface normally does not include

  • the space occupied by the Universal Product Code (UPC);
  • bottom;
  • closures;
  • indented area on the top of some egg cartons;
  • inside of top (when no written information is present);
  • rounded corners

Sometimes the paper label used in some clear plastic cartons covers only a small part of the panels of the lid. It is important to note that the available display surface of a clear plastic carton is calculated using the size of the outside surfaces of the lid, and not the size of the paper label.

NFT Templates

See appendix K-1 of the Nutrition Labelling Toolkit for the Compendium of Templates for Nutrition Facts Tables.

Orientation of Nutrition Facts Table

When there is sufficient space to do so, the Nutrition Facts table must be oriented in the same manner as other information appearing on the package. Otherwise, it is to be oriented in any other manner that fits.

d) Different Types of Containers

i) Pulp View - 12 Eggs (One Dozen)

The typical pulp view - 12 egg carton does not have a large enough continuous surface on the available display surface to accommodate the bilingual standard and bilingual horizontal formats of the Nutrition Facts table. Companies have the choice of using several options including the following:

  • bilingual standard format (condensed font)
  • bilingual horizontal format (condensed font)
  • linear format
  • alternate method as allowed under the Food and Drug Regulations

The format that best fits on a pulp view 12-egg carton is the linear format in English and French. Any optional nutrients that are declared in addition to the mandatory core nutrients must also be displayed in the chosen format. Note that a toll-free number is not an acceptable option because the pulp view 12-egg carton has an available display surface of >100 cm2 and the small package rules do not apply.

Example - What format and version to use:

Note: This is an example only, and the ADS will differ between manufacturers for the same type of egg containers. It is the industry's responsibility to ensure the proper Nutrition Facts Table is used.

Pulp View 12 Egg Carton
Step 1 Calculate ADS
The available display area of a flat top egg carton is calculated as follows:
(Top - indent) + 2 sides + (Front - closures) + Back - area for UPC
(208 cm2 - 104 cm2) + 2(14 cm2) + [50 cm2 – 2(1.5 cm2)] + (50 cm2 - 12 cm2) = 217 cm2

Step 2 Calculate 15% of ADS
(0.15)(217 cm2) = 32.6 cm2

Step 3 what format & version of NFT to use

Referring to the rules provided in the guide, and using Appendix K-1 of the Toolkit, the following formats could be used:

  • Bilingual horizontal format version 4.5 (requires only a bilingual table)
  • Linear format version 16.1 (requires a table in English and French)

ii) Pulp View - 6 or 8 Egg

  • 6 and 8 egg pulp view cartons normally have an available display surface of <100 cm2. Therefore, the rules for small packages apply, which include the possible option of using a toll-free number or a mailing address to obtain nutrition facts information.
  • This option will not be permitted if a nutrient content claim or health-related claim is made on the carton or in an advertisement for the product, including the Health Check symbol.
  • If a toll-free number or mailing address is used, a statement describing how a consumer may obtain the nutrition information must be included on the carton in English and French, in a type size of not less than 8 points. Examples of acceptable wording would be "for nutrition information call / write to": and "Pour la valeur nutritive, veuillez composer le/écrire à".

iii) Pulp Flat / Foam Flat / Clear Plastic - All Sizes

  • It is normal practice for consumers to open egg cartons in the store to check the eggs. For this reason, the underside of the lid may be considered part of the available display surface of the egg carton.
  • If a company does not wish to use the underside of the lid at all, they do not have to count it as available display surface.
  • If a company wishes to put any print (including information on Health Check, company history, Dear Customer, etc.) on the underside of the lid, the entire area will automatically be considered available display surface.

Examples - What Format and Version to Use:
Please be advised these are only examples and the ADS will differ between manufacturers for the same type of egg containers and it is the industry's responsibility to ensure the proper Nutrition Facts Table is used.

i. Flat Top 12 Egg Carton - No Information On Underside of Lid

Step 1 Calculate ADS
The available display area of a flat top egg carton where no information is displayed on the underside of the lid is calculated as follows:
Top + 2 Sides + Front + Back - Area for UPC - Closures
182 cm2 + 2(15 cm2) + 65 cm2 + 65 cm2 - 10 cm2 - 10 cm2 = 322 cm2

Step 2 Calculate 15% of ADS
(0.15)(322 cm2) = 48.3 cm2

Step 3 What Format & Version of NFT to Use
Referring to the rules provided in the guide, and using Appendix K-1 of the Toolkit, the following tables could be used

  • Standard Format version 1.3 (requires a table in English and French)
  • Narrow Standard version 2.2 (requires a table in English and French)
  • Bilingual Standard version 3.1 (requires only a bilingual table)

ii. Flat Top 12 Egg Carton - Information on the Underside of Lid
Step 1 Calculate ADS

Assuming we are using the same carton as in the previous example, to calculate the ADS we add the underside area of the carton to the ADS
322 cm2 + 182 cm2 = 504 cm2

Step 2 Calculate 15% of ADS
(0.15)(504 cm2) = 75.6 cm2

Step 3 What Format & Version of NFT to Use
Referring to the rules provided in the guide, and using Appendix K-1 of the Toolkit, the following tables could be used

  • Standard Format version 1.1 (requires a table in each, French and English)
  • Narrow Standard version 2.1 (requires a table in each, French and English)
  • Bilingual Standard version 3.1 (requires only a single table)

As a general rule, industry is using the bilingual standard format on egg cartons. It is useful to know that any ADS greater than 280.7 cm2 requires the largest version of this table to be used

iii) Split Egg Cartons

Egg cartons that allow consumers to split them in half require all marking requirements to be present on each half of the carton, including the Nutrition Facts Table. When calculating the ADS it will be based on the carton after splitting.

iv) Egg Boxes

The ADS on egg boxes or cases is sufficient enough that the largest appropriate version of the Nutrition Facts table is used.

If the eggs inside the egg box are the same size, the Nutrition Facts table should be displayed in one of the following three formats on the box.

  • The largest version (1.1) of the standard format in both French and English, or
  • The largest version (2.1) of the narrow standard format in both French and English, or
  • The largest version (3.1) of the bilingual standard format

If the box is used to pack various sizes of eggs (size marking is accomplished by a check-off system), the Nutrition Facts table should be displayed in the Aggregate format on the box, either:

  • the largest version (14.1) of the aggregate format - different amounts of food in both French and English or
  • the largest version (15.1) of the bilingual aggregate format - different amounts of food

v) Egg Trays with over-wrap

The ADS on over-wrapped trays, containing 30 eggs, is sufficient enough that either of the following Nutrition Facts tables are used:

  • the largest version (1.1) of the standard format in both French and English or
  • the largest version (2.1) of the narrow standard format in both French and English or
  • the largest version (3.1) of the bilingual standard format

e) Additional information regarding eggs not intended for retail

In the case of eggs not intended for retail, that are shipped to the same purchaser on a continual basis, the CFIA would not object to nutrition information being provided to the purchaser on the basis of the first shipment, without having to provide the information on an ongoing basis provided the purchaser agrees in writing to this arrangement.

The manner in which the information is presented is not prescribed, therefore it may be displayed as a NFT or other manners, however, the mandatory information remains the same.

If for any reason the nutrient value changes the supplier will need to update the document with the new nutrition values. This policy applies to purchasers such as restaurants, hotels, Institutions, bakeries and other manufacturers. For further information on this policy please see the Accompanying Documentation for Nutrition Labelling

Please note the following conditions related to the NFT on labels of eggs for further processing:

  • The nutrient values must be unrounded
  • The serving size must be 100 g
  • Percentages of daily values may be omitted
  • The vitamin and mineral units must be as per table I, divisions I and II of part D of the FDR:
    • Vitamin A: RE
    • Vitamin C: mg
    • Calcium: mg
    • Fe: mg

7.8.2.2 Nutrition Claims

Nutrition claims can be divided into two main categories; nutrient content claims and health claims. All nutrition claims must be displayed in English and French.

a) Nutrient Content Claims

A nutrient content claim is any statement or expression which describes, explicitly or implicitly the level of a nutrient in a food. The regulations specify the conditions that must be met for a food to qualify for a nutrient content claim, and the exact wording that is permitted. Only the nutrient content claims and prescribed wording set out in the Food and Drug Regulations are permitted. See table to B.01.513 of the FDR or chapter 7 of the Guide for the complete list of claims and their conditions.

There are a variety of nutrient content claims that can be made on egg containers. It is the industry's responsibility to ensure any nutrient claims they are making are accurate; lab analyses are required for specialty eggs. For eggs that are produced under a modified feed to attain specific nutrient levels, as part of ensuring the nutrient claim is accurate, the industry should have measures in place to ensure the modified eggs get placed in the correct egg containers.

It is the inspector's responsibility to take samples in accordance with the national sampling plans to verify nutrient content claims on egg containers.

A nutrient content claim must be made on the unrounded value of that nutrient; it is not acceptable to use rounding rules to satisfy a condition of a claim, whether rounding up or down. See section 7.8.2.1(b) for more information on rounding rules.

i) Serving Size and Reference Amount as Basis for Nutrient Content Claims

The Food and Drug Regulations require that nutrient content claims be made on the basis of the serving size and the reference amount for the food.

The reference amount is a specific regulated quantity, for each type of food, which reflects an amount people usually eat at one sitting. Schedule M of the Food and Drug Regulations lists reference amounts for foods. For shell eggs, the reference amount is 50g. Since serving sizes may vary, any nutrient content claims must hold true for both the serving size and the reference amount.

The serving size for eggs represents the edible portion of the eggs and will vary depending upon the size category. Other than Peewee size eggs, the edible portion is based on the minimum weight of the egg in its size designation.

ii) Cholesterol Claims

Cholesterol claims do not exist on egg labels since the nutritional characteristics of eggs cannot currently meet the conditions set out in the FDR for those claims.

Modified eggs

Graders that market eggs whose nutrient content has been modified through the feed will need to have their own nutrient analysis done, including cholesterol. The cholesterol content for generic eggs cannot be used for eggs that have had their contents modified through the feed. It is important to note that eggs claiming to have levels of cholesterol that are lower than the level found in generic eggs may be targeted for laboratory testing.

iii) Omega-3 Claims

The Food and Drug Regulations allow for the declaration of monounsaturated and Omega-3 and Omega-6 polyunsaturated in the Nutrition Facts table. In order to market eggs as A Source of Omega 3 Polyunsaturated Fatty acids, requirements of the regulations must be followed. A declaration of any one of the three groups of fatty acids, monounsaturated, omega-6 or omega-3 polyunsaturated, triggers the declaration of all three.

In order to make an omega-3 claim on an egg carton, the eggs must contain 0.3 g or more of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids per reference amount and serving of stated size. The permitted wordings for this claim are listed in the Food and Drug Regulations, however, "Source of omega-3 polyunsaturated/Source de polyinsaturés oméga-3" is typically used.

Implied Omega 3 claims

Implied Omega-3 claims will be accepted on egg containers when they immediately precede or follow an omega-3 claim and meet all the criteria of B.01.511 in that they

  • do not modify the nature of the claim. Words such as ultra, very, extra, plus, at least, less than are considered to modify the nature of the implied claim.
  • are not accompanied by a brand name, unless the product has been especially processed or modified to meet the requirements of the claim, and
  • if the food has not been specially processed or modified to meet the claim, the statement/claim shall characterize all similar foods and not only the specific food.

Example:

  • Omega-3 Eggs

May only be used if it is immediately preceded or followed by: Source of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated (or other permitted wording for this claim)

iv) Protein Claims

Eggs have a protein rating of 40 per reasonable daily intake, therefore the following protein claims may be used:

  • excellent source of protein
  • very high protein
  • very high in protein
  • rich in protein

Calculating the Protein Rating for Eggs

Protein Rating (amount of protein in a reasonable intake of the food) X (protein efficiency ratio for that food)

  • A reasonable intake for eggs, in accordance with schedule K of the Food and Drug Regulations, is two 50 g servings or 100 g.
  • The percent protein in an egg is 12.8%
  • Protein Efficiency Ratio for eggs is 3.1

Protein Rating for Eggs (100 g x 12.8% of protein per egg) X 3.1 = 40 (39.64)

v) Vitamin and Mineral Nutrient Claims

In order for a vitamin or mineral nutrient claim to be made on an egg carton, the serving of stated size must contain at least 5% or more of the recommended daily intake (RDI). Claims cannot be made for vitamins or mineral nutrients that have no Recommended Daily Value established.

Permitted claims based on minimum RDI of a nutrient
Table Summary

This table lists the claims that can be made for various RDIs for vitamins and minerals

Claim Minimum RDI
"Contains"
"source of"
5%
"good source of"
"high in"
15%
"excellent source of"
"very high in rich in"
25%

Where a nutrient content claim is made for a vitamin or mineral which is not in the list of core nutrients it triggers the requirement to add that vitamin or mineral to the Nutrition Facts Table.

Note: any claims made for vitamins and minerals must be made based on the % of RDI, per serving of stated size.

The following table provides a list of vitamin and mineral content claims which may be made on containers of generic Canada A Large eggs based on EFC's data:

Permitted nutrient claims for shell eggs
Table Summary

This table lists various nutrient content claims that can be made on shell egg labels

Nutrient May declare per serving of 1 large egg (53 g)
Vitamin A a source of
Vitamin C no claim
Calcium no claim
Iron a source of
Vitamin D a good source of
Vitamin E a good source of
Riboflavin a good source of
Niacin a source of
Folate a good source of
Vitamin B12 a excellent source of
Pantothenate a good source of
Phosphorus a source of
Zinc a source of
Selenium an excellent source of

One or more of the above claims may be made for eggs. However, as an example for Canada A Large Size Eggs, the per serving of 53g (1 egg) or per serving of 106g (2 eggs) declarations must be consistent for each claim. These declarations are based on the edible portion of the egg..

b) Comparative Claims

The Guide to Food Labelling and Advertising, Section 7.9.1, defines comparative claims as those claims which compare directly or indirectly the nutritional properties of two or more foods. Comparative claims may highlight the positive characteristics of a food such as contains X% more Y, or the negative characteristics such as contains X% less of. The reference food which is used as a basis for the comparison of nutritional properties must either be the company's other brand of the same food, a different version of the same food, or in the same food group in Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating. Comparative claims may not be made against regular eggs (i.e. typical nutrient values of Canadian eggs as established by the Egg Farmers of Canada).

When a comparative claim is made, the following conditions apply:

  • The reference food must be a similar food or of the same food group. No comparison should be made between foods from different food groups.
  • The reference food and the amount of difference must be clearly identified.
  • The comparison is to be based on a significant difference with the reference food. Reductions or increases in nutrient content of less than 25 percent per serving from the reference value are of questionable nutritional significance and are not acceptable. When the level of the nutrient in the unaltered or reference food is initially low, a difference of 25 percent may not result in a significant difference. In these cases, there must also be a significant absolute difference between the foods being compared. Example: 10 mg of calcium compared to 13 mg. It is a 30% increase by quantity, but only 0.2% increase in recommended daily intake (RDI). The absolute difference is insignificant and therefore is not an acceptable for a comparative claim.
  • Only includes those nutrients, in the table following section B.01.513 of the Food and Drug Regulations, which provide for comparative claims. The comparative claim must use the prescribed wording as allowed in column 4 of this table.
  • Both serving sizes must be identified if amounts are not equal.

An example of an acceptable comparative claim is:

  • 33% less fat than our regular Brand XYZ eggs

Some examples of unacceptable comparative claims are:

  • 33% less fat than regular eggs
  • 200% more lutein than our regular eggs (Lutein is not listed as a nutrient in the table following section B.01.513 of the Food and Drug Regulations.)

c) Enhanced

Enhanced is the term that is to be used when a nutrient in an egg has been increased via the feed. The terms fortified and enriched are not to be used to describe shell eggs, because they would only be used for foods where nutrients have been added directly to the food. Using enhanced to describe eggs is considered a comparative claim, and the requirements for making a comparative claim apply, i.e. there must be a significant increase in the content of that vitamin or mineral in the egg (see section on comparative claims).

d) Quantitative declarations outside the Nutrition Facts table

The amounts of many nutrients are permitted to be displayed outside the NFT. These nutrients include:

  • nutrients required or permitted inside the NFT
  • nutrients not required or permitted inside the NFT (e.g. DHA)
  • constituents of nutrients (amino acids)

All quantitative declarations outside the NFT must be made on the basis of a serving of stated size in the units specified in table 7-1 of the Guide and must not contain any additional words used to qualify the declaration, such as contains and only.

Additionally, other food constituents that do not fall under the above categories, such as lutein, may also be declared under the same conditions as above. No units are specified for the declaration of these constituents, however the unit should be appropriate for that constituent, not giving a misleading impression of the content.

An example of an acceptable quantitative declaration:
0.85 mg lutein per large egg (53 g)

An example of an unacceptable quantitative declaration:
Contains only 185 mg of cholesterol per egg

7.8.3 Health Claims

The Food and Drug Regulations allows for the use of several diet related health claims. These optional health claims highlight the characteristics of a diet that reduces the risk of developing certain diseases. They also reinforce how the food fits into a healthy diet.

The regulations specify the criteria that a food must meet to qualify for a health claim, and the wording that can be used, to ensure consistency and accuracy.

Shell eggs do not qualify for the use of any of the permitted health claims.

7.8.4 Optional Markings

7.8.4.1 Product of Canada

Language

  • Meets the language requirements of the province or country where the eggs will be sold.

Location

  • Cartons or a tray with an over wrap: Any outside panel other than bottom
  • Boxes, cases and pallets with loose eggs: One of four sides

Requirement

  • The words are mandatory when the eggs are to be exported.

Eggs Sold in the Province of Quebec

  • The province of Quebec food regulations require that the place of origin be specified (country or province) on all containers of eggs sold in Quebec.
  • Containers of eggs produced and sold in Quebec must say "Produit du Québec".

Minimum Type Size

  • cartons and trays with an overwrap: 1.5 mm
  • boxes, cases and pallets with loose eggs: 13 mm

Note: Alternatively, a container of eggs may be identified as product from a specific region (e.g. Product of Atlantic Canada) as long as the statement can be shown to be factual.

7.8.4.2 Organic

When the claim organic is applied to a container of eggs, the operator must be able to demonstrate that all precautions have been taken to ensure the eggs meet the requirements of the organic claim. The operator must have a valid organic certificate and a plan ensuring only organic eggs are packed in containers bearing the organic claim, however it is the certifying body's responsibility, not the inspector's, to verify and monitor the plan.

The Organic Products Regulations apply to domestic and imported products. They define specific requirements for organic products to be labeled as organic or to bear the Canada Organic logo. Four categories exist for organic food:

  • Organic Agricultural Products (100% organic)
  • Multi-Ingredient products with an organic content greater than 95%,
  • Products with organic content between 70-95%,
  • Products with organic content under 70%

Shell eggs, being a single ingredient product, fall under the category of Organic Agricultural Products. Under this category, the eggs may be identified as organic and may bear the logo on the label. The use of the logo is voluntary. In the case of imported eggs, the country of origin (Product of X) or the word Imported must appear in close proximity to the logo, if a logo is used. The statements referred to in this paragraph must appear on the label in both English and French unless otherwise exempt from bilingual labelling.

Section 7.14.2.1 also prescribes the location of the country of origin statement. Therefore, if applicable, to avoid having to print two statements, the Maple Leaf and Canada Organic logo should appear in the same vicinity of the label with the country of origin statement in close proximity. In this case, the word imported is not sufficient.

Variations, such as organically produced or other similar wording are permitted, however, other words such as certified and 100% are not allowed.

The full name of the certification body that has certified the product as organic must appear on the label. Abbreviations and acronyms alone are not acceptable. The certification body for the party which last manipulated or packed the product is the one which should appear on the label. For example:

  • Eggs shipped from the producer to the grader must indicate the producer's certification body on the label or tag
  • Eggs packed at a domestic or foreign grading station must indicate that station's certification body on the label
  • Eggs that are imported and repacked in Canada must indicate the Canadian grading station's certification body on the label.

Inspectors must make sure that the certification body is accredited by the CFIA. The certification bodies, listed by country, can be found at the following address:
Certification Bodies Providing Organic Certification Services Under the Canada Organic Regime.

For more information on organic products, please contact your Area Egg Specialist, the Canada Organic Office, or consult the Organic Products website at the following address:
Organic Products

7.9 Other Claims

All the information on food labels must be true and not misleading or deceptive. Words and illustrations should not be used to exaggerate, mislead or misrepresent.

7.9.1 Illustrations

Pictures and charts are common and valuable aids to advertising. These should, however, not be used to exaggerate, mislead or misrepresent the characteristics of the product.

7.9.2 Use of Superlatives

Superlatives such as best, superior and premium should be used carefully. They are acceptable when used in conjunction with a brand name, or to compare a product to another product by the same manufacturer. Using a superlative in conjunction with the brand name may only be used on their highest quality products. If the product is an improvement over one previously made by the same firm, this should be clearly indicated and the nature of the improvement should be identified.

Section 18 of the Egg Regulations states that:

No container of eggs graded pursuant to these Regulations shall be marked with

  • any word or words declaring or implying that the eggs packed therein are superior in quality to the grade marked thereon; or
  • any word or words indicative of size other than a size designation.

The use of superlatives is not allowed in conjunction with grade names and sizes. Words such as super, ultra, premium or superior, used in conjunction with any grade mark on the carton are deemed to be in contravention of Section 18 of the Egg Regulations. If such terms are used on the container, they must be qualified to make it clear that they do not relate to the size or quality of the eggs packed in the container.

An example of an acceptable claim is:

  • Brand XYZ's best eggs

An example of an unacceptable claim is:

  • Brand XYZ eggs have a superior taste

7.9.3 New, Improved

If a food is described as new it is implied that such a food was never before offered for sale by the manufacturer, or that it has been substantially altered. In many cases, such terms are used to describe the packaging, the labelling or such factors as a new flavor. "Improved" implies that the food, or some aspect of the food, has been modified to make it better than before. In all cases, such claims are valid for a period of one year or less in the region where they are made. Once 12 months have passed, the claim on that particular egg carton is no longer valid. When such claims are made, the aspect of the product that is new or improved should be stated on the label.

7.9.4 Claims about Composition and Quality

7.9.4.1 No Preservatives

A No preservatives claim alone is not acceptable if it implies that it is referring to the eggs. It is not possible to add preservatives to a shell egg because it is a self-enclosed food.

7.9.4.2 Fresh

The term Fresh is permitted only when it is accompanied by the statement that all eggs are fresh, not implying that one brand of eggs is more fresh than the others.

Other similar terms such as from the farm to you, or, direct from the farm are permitted on egg cartons only if they are factual. (i.e. the eggs move directly from the farm, where they were produced and graded, to the store without moving through a wholesale level or through a grocer's warehouse.)

Some examples of acceptable claims are:

  • All eggs are fresh
  • Like all eggs, these eggs are fresh

Some examples of unacceptable claims are:

  • Brand XYZ - The freshest eggs
  • Super fresh eggs

7.9.4.3 Natural

Foods described as natural should not have been subjected to any process that significantly altered their original physical, chemical, or biological state Guide to Food Labelling and Advertising, Section 4.7

It is agreed that shell eggs are natural since they have not been subject to any physical, chemical or biological processes that significantly altered their original state. It is acceptable to describe eggs as natural as long as it is accompanied by a statement such as All eggs are natural. Without this explanation or similar statement explaining that all eggs are natural adjacent to the claim, consumers could be lead to believe that other eggs not making this claim are not natural.

If the word natural or any part of the word is used as an element of a trade or brand name, the statement that All eggs are natural will be required in letter heights equal to the minimum letter heights (1.5 mm) required by the Egg Regulations.

Some examples of acceptable claims are:

  • All eggs are natural
  • Like all eggs, these eggs are natural

An example of an unacceptable claim is:

  • Brand XYZ eggs are natural

7.9.4.4 Claims Regarding Grades and Sizes

Grade names and size standards have been established for eggs under the authority of the Canada Agricultural Products Act. Grade names cannot be used to describe products which have not been graded (Guide to Food Labelling and Advertising, Section 4.15).

It is illegal to describe products by an improper grade or size designation or by any words, symbols or pictures that could be mistaken for a legally established grade or size description. Superlatives are not permitted in conjunction with grade or size designations.

7.9.5 Origin Claims

Geographical terms are acceptable as long as they are truthful and not misleading.

7.10 Novel Products and Processes

Labelling for product produced through new processes (e.g. in-shell pasteurization) require a ruling by CFIA and/or Health Canada. Submissions must be forwarded to the Area Egg Specialist for review.

7.11 Animal Production Claims

Animal production claims can cross commodities and need careful consideration to ensure a uniform ruling is applied that serves both consumers and the industry. The acceptance of a claim should be discussed with the Area Egg Specialist.

7.12 Inspection of Egg Labels

Frequency:

Label verifications are to be performed at the frequency identified in the national work plans. As part of their inspection duties, CFIA inspectors will maintain a current and accurate file of all egg cartons in use in the egg station. Aspects of nutritional labelling will be assessed each time a sample is taken for composition sampling. The egg station operator should involve the inspector when a new label is considered to ensure compliance with the applicable regulations.

Records:

1. Routine assessment

The forms in Appendix I and II are used to complete each label review. This review is conducted to ensure that no changes to the carton have been made during the year.

2. Compositional Analysis

The Laboratory Sample Tracking System (LSTS) report of analysis is used to verify that nutritional information in the nutrition facts table and nutrient content claims are accurate. When a label violation has occurred, additional records may include, but are not limited to, detention & release reports, action plans and warning letters. As a minimum these records will be filed and maintained by the responsible inspector at the local CFIA office. Copies of reports requiring the operator's signature will be provided to the operator.
The records must indicate the non-compliance has been corrected or where compliance action is still in progress that the remaining non-compliant thing remains under control.

Note: Where there has been no change to a label from one year to the next it is sufficient for the inspector to identify it as such on the Label Verification Form without completing the remainder of the form.

Actions to Take on Non-Compliant Labels:

Once the label review is completed, a copy of the Label Verification Form is given to the station manager. If non-compliances were found, the inspector is to notify the company in writing, detailing the affected product, the non-compliances, the applicable legislation, and time frame for corrective action.

The time frame for corrective action should be determined on a case by case basis for issues other than nutrition labelling depending on the severity of the non-compliance.
When a non-compliance is related to nutrition labelling, the Minimum Enforcement Guidelines (MEG) - (Internal access only) for Nutrition should be consulted to determine the appropriate time frame for corrective action.

In cases of serious non-compliances, it may be necessary to place the affected product under detention until the non-compliance has been corrected.

If a food safety issue exists and any amount of affected product is no longer in control of the manufacturer, the issue is to be entered into the IMS and forwarded to the Office of
Food Safety and Response for recall consideration.

Any request by the station manager to sticker over net quantity errors should be forwarded to the Area Egg Specialist.

7.13 Advertising

All advertising must be factual and accurate. In general, mandatory information or claims that are acceptable on egg carton labels may also be used to advertise eggs. Any information that is not acceptable on the label is generally also not acceptable in advertising. Companies should ensure that labels are in compliance before developing advertisements for the food.

7.13.1 Internet Advertising

Material on the Internet promoting the sale of food in Canada is considered advertising as per the Food and Drugs Act and therefore is subject to the Food and Drugs Act and Regulations. If the information on the website is not in compliance, it should be brought into compliance or removed. All complaints about Internet advertising are to be directed to the Area Egg Specialist who will forward the information to the Retail Food Officers for follow-up and resolution.

7.14 Imported Eggs

Shell eggs imported into Canada must be packed and labelled in accordance with Canadian laws and regulations.

7.14.1 Packaging

See section 7.7

7.14.2 Labelling

7.14.2.1 Labelling Requirements

All requirements previously mentioned in this chapter also apply to imports. In addition the following information must also appear on the label:

  • The official grade and size designation of the exporting country, if graded in that country. Abbreviations are not permitted.
  • The country of origin must appear in a conspicuous manner in one of the following ways:
    • Cartons, or trays with an overwrap: minimum type size of 1.5 mm
    • In close proximity to the Maple Leaf when graded in Canada,
    • On the front or top panel when graded in the exporting country
    • Boxes, cases and pallets with loose eggs: minimum type size of 6 mm
    • In close proximity to the Maple Leaf when graded in Canada
    • On the same side as the official grade and size designation

Please note:

  • The Nutrition Facts table must be in the Canadian format, and nutrient values must be representative of the eggs of the exporting country
  • Bilingual requirements apply to imported eggs

7.14.2.2 Label Approval

All labels for shell eggs that are being imported into Canada originating from a foreign country must be submitted to the CFIA for review. Labels for eggs originating from the USA must be approved by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

The procedures for USDA label approval are as follows:

  1. The USDA plant wishing to export eggs to Canada must submit the label to the National Supervisor, Shell Egg, Poultry Program-Grading Branch, Washington D.C.
  2. The National Supervisor ensures that the label meets the USDA requirements and then submits the label to the appropriate Area Egg Specialist in Canada for review.
  3. The label is reviewed by the Area Egg Specialist or designate to ensure that the label meets the Canadian requirements. Any comments for changes are referred back to the National Supervisor for correction.
Once approval is determined, the carton is assigned an approval number by the USDA and then copies of the approved label are returned to the CFIA inspector for inclusion in the plant records

7.15 Exported Eggs

7.15.1 Eggs exported to the USA

The procedures for label approval are as follows:

  1. The Canadian exporter sends the label to the Area Egg Specialist and to the National Supervisor, Shell Egg, Poultry Program - Grading Branch, Washington, D.C.
  2. The National Supervisor ensures the label meets the USDA requirements. Any comments for changes are referred to the Canadian exporter for correction.
  3. Once the label is approved by the USDA, the carton is assigned an approval number by the USDA, the exporter is informed by letter, and copies of the approved label are then returned to the CFIA inspector.

This process is to be done once for each different label and is intended to prevent product from being detained, returned and the exporter unable to use the packaging material for future shipments.

7.15.2 Other Exports

It is the Canadian exporter's responsibility to ensure that the label meets the requirements of the country to which the eggs are exported. In order to determine if there are any special/specific labelling requirements to the exporting country, the Canadian exporter should contact the Area Egg Specialist

Appendix

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