Processed Egg Manual - Chapter 4 - Product Inspection

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Table of Contents

4.1 Objective of Activity

Processed egg products are inspected to ensure that regulatory requirements for standard, composition and safety are met.

4.2 References

Canada Agricultural Products Act
Egg Regulations
Processed Egg Regulations
Consumer Packaging and Labeling Act
Food and Drugs Act
Food and Drug Regulations

4.3 Required Equipment

  • Calibrated thermometer
  • Egg scale with check weight
  • Statistical calculator or computer equipped with appropriate software

The following equipment needs only be made available to the inspector as needed:

  • Reference weights (certified annually)
  • Digital scale
  • Volumetric kit
  • Certified thermometer
  • Net Weight Verification kit

Important: Glass thermometers should not be used in processing facilities. A glass thermometer may be used as the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA's) calibrated thermometer to check the other thermometers for accuracy.

4.4 Required Forms

Note: All forms listed but not linked from this page are intended for internal use. CFIA staff can access these forms using the CFIA internal forms catalogue.

Shell Egg Destination Report (Form CFIA/ACIA 1017)
Inspection Report of Shell/Processed Egg (CFIA/ACIA 5109)
Processed Egg Station Sanitation and Operation Report (CFIA/ACIA 1082)
Certificate of Inspection for Processed Egg (CFIA/ACIA 2684)
Notice of Detention (CFIA/ACIA 3256)
Notice of Release from Detention (CFIA/ACIA 3257)
Application for Inspection (CFIA/ACIA 5435)

4.5 Shell Egg Inspection at Processed Egg Stations

4.5.1 Inspection of Shell Eggs For Breaking

All grades of shell eggs (Canada A, B, C, Nest Run) as well as ungraded eggs may be used to produce processed egg. Nest Run and ungraded eggs may only be used where washers and scanners are in place and functioning, as the eggs must be washed and scanned before breaking.

Where an in-line grader declares Canada Nest Run eggs and washes them prior to them arriving at the processed egg station, arrangements may be made to only require that the eggs be scanned. This would require a signed statement from the supplier of the Nest Run eggs stating that they have washed the eggs prior to arriving at the processed egg station. As part of their regular inspection duties, the inspector at the processed egg station verifies that the eggs have been washed.

Eggs used for breaking must meet the standards for their respective grade:

  1. Canada A and B product: Appendix I (grade requirements) and Schedule IV (inspection requirements) of the Egg Regulations are followed.
  2. Canada C: Appendix I (grade requirements).
  3. Nest Run: Nest Run standards in Appendix I are followed.
  4. Ungraded: There are no regulated standards for ungraded eggs destined for processing at a registered egg processing station, other than those set out in section 4.(1) of the Processed Egg Regulations.

A summary of the Shell Egg Grading Requirements System can be found in Appendix I.

4.5.2 Sampling Of Shell Eggs For Breaking

The Shell Egg Destination Report (Form CFIA/ACIA 1017) is used for sampling shell eggs at a processed egg station (destination inspection). Destination tolerances from Schedule IV of the Egg Regulations determine whether a lot passes or fails. The reverse side of Shell Egg Destination Report (CFIA/ACIA 1017) includes a sample and tolerance table which is used to determine the number of samples required and the maximum undergrades permitted for that sample size. Proper random sampling techniques are to be used when sampling. See the Product Inspection Chapter of the Shell Egg Inspection Manual for further details.

4.5.3 Frequency of Inspecting Breaking Stock

As a guideline, breaking stock should be checked for grade compliance once a month with the intent of checking each supplier once a year. In addition, breaking stock should be inspected whenever there is suspicion that the identified lot may fail. An inspection of breaking stock may also be required upon request (cost recoverable).

4.5.4 CFIA Administrative Tolerances For Canada A, B And C Inspected At Destination

In addition to the evaluation of the lot based on the destination tolerance, the administrative tolerance for product inspected at destination must also be applied.The administrative tolerance allows for some leakers and rejects in the lot. The following administrative tolerances may be used for the inspection of shell eggs destined for breaking.

Administrative Tolerances at Destination
Leakers Reject (1)
Canada A/B 1 per sample (2) 1 per sample
Canada C 3 per sample 1 per sample
  1. Dirts are included in the administrative reject tolerance
  2. A sample consists of 60 eggs
  3. If a lot exceeds the reject tolerance due to mixed rots, permission may be given for the load to be sorted at the scanner at the breaking station under the following conditions:
    1. all rejects are removed by a company employee at the scanner prior to the product being broken
    2. the speed of the breaking machine is reduced so that all rejects can be removed
    3. the inspection tank is installed and operating
    4. the lot of eggs is broken under the supervision of a CFIA Inspector
    5. if any reject egg is broken, the cup and all equipment which may have come in contact with the egg is washed and sanitized;
  4. Moldy eggs are considered inedible and are not eligible for washing or breaking.

The number of leakers and rejects in the lot should be calculated as an average for the lot at the end of the inspection and compared to the administrative tolerance. If the number of reject eggs or leakers found during the inspection is more that the Administrative Tolerance, the lot fails and will be detained, even if the number of undergrades was found to be acceptable.

CFIA Administrative Tolerances For Canada Nest Run Eggs Inspected At Destination

At destination, a tolerance is applied to allow for damage that may occur during transportation.

Table: Canada Nest Run Destination Tolerance
Defect Destination
Cracked shells 13%
Dirt >160 mm² 5%
Leakers or Rejects 5%
Total 20%

4.5.5 Failed Inspection

If these tolerances are exceeded, the lot fails, regardless of whether or not the maximum under grade level has been exceeded.

All eggs for breaking are expected to meet the grade claimed. If these eggs are inspected, and fail to meet the grade standards, they are detained. If they are inspected at a processed egg station and fail, they are to be shipped to a registered egg station to be reworked and then released. If moldy eggs are identified in the lot, the inspector should contact the Area Egg Specialist to discuss whether sorting is an option in disposition of the product.

The disposition of eggs which have failed an inspection is the responsibility of the owner of the eggs. The inspector is responsible for accepting or rejecting the owners corrective action. When an acceptable corrective action has been forwarded by the owner, the inspector will complete a detention report and possibly the authority to move section of the report depending upon the corrective action proposed. A release from detention is completed by the inspector once the product is no longer in violation. This may require additional inspection documentation to support the reason for release.

4.6 Processed Egg Inspection

Several tests are used to ensure that processed egg products meet the standards set out in the Processed Egg Regulations, and the Food and Drugs Act. Annual work plans are developed to outline the frequency of these tests.

4.6.1 Organoleptic Evaluation Of Liquid Egg

Frequency: Unpasteurized tanks - twice per shift
Unpasteurized silos - daily
Pasteurized - twice per shift at packaging
Record: Inspector's Daily Log
Distribution: Filed in CFIA Inspection Office

Off odours may be the result of spoilage or contamination from a foreign substance. Bulk containers of liquid egg should be monitored to detect off odour.

All tankers of liquid egg received should be subjected to an organoleptic evaluation prior to unloading.

Procedure:

  1. The lid of the tanker is opened and the inspector smells the liquid egg to determine if the odour is normal for liquid egg or if the odour is off.
  2. In stations that store liquid egg in silos, the inspector must dispense egg from the spigot on the silo into a sterile inspection cup and perform the odour evaluation.

4.6.1.1 Protocol For Off Odour Liquid

This protocol should be followed by all inspectors that are evaluating containers of egg where off-odour is suspected.These containers include pails, totes, storage tanks, silos or stainless steel tankers.

Note:

  1. Tanks of egg that are only partially full will produce a stronger odour. The air space above the liquid will trap the odour thus producing a stronger smell.
  2. Tanks of liquid egg that have developed a layer of foam must also be carefully assessed to assure the liquid is being evaluated and not the foam.The foam layer on top of the liquid egg is exposed to the warmer airspace in the tank and is not being agitated to the same extent as the liquid in the tank.

Procedures:

  1. If an off odour is detected in a tank of liquid egg, the inspector should obtain two sterile sample cups for the evaluation. Use the sterile plastic sample cups that are used to send samples to the lab.
  2. The inspector should also ask that someone from the processing station accompany them during this sampling.
  3. The first sample of liquid should be taken from the top of the tank making every effort to exclude foam.
  4. The second sample should be taken from the valve of the tank generally located at the bottom of the tank. When sampling from the valve, it is important to flush several litres of egg through the valve before you take the sample. This allows for any stale product in the valve and tank port to be flushed out.
  5. These two samples should be taken to a non processing area of the station which is free of any odours, for a second odour evaluation. Generally this evaluation should be done in an office that is well away from the processing area, and again should be done with station personnel.
  6. If an off odour is detected from the liquid in the cups, other available egg product inspectors or the supervisor may be called in to also evaluate the liquid in the cups. The quality assurance manager or station manager should also be called to evaluate the samples of liquid in the cups.

When the off odour is only detected in the foam:

  1. Where off odour has been detected in the foam and not the liquid egg product the samples of liquid in your two sample cups will not smell off.
  2. Under these circumstances the station is given permission to draw and process the liquid egg from the tank but must stop drawing liquid out of the tank before any foam can be introduced into the product line.

Disposition of off odour product:

  1. If the decision is made that the liquid egg has an off odour and cannot be used for human consumption, the product is detained and the station operator is asked to isolate the tank of product by disconnecting any pipes which would allow the product to be processed with edible product.
  2. The owner of the product must then decide on the disposition of the product, pending CFIA approval, and communicate this to the inspector. Generally their choices are to process the liquid as inedible or to dispose of the liquid at a landfill location.

Disposal of liquid egg at a landfill location may be subject to provincial or municipal legislation which is the operator's responsibility to determine and comply with.

When the off odour product is received in bulk:

  1. If the off odour product is in a stainless steel tanker, the station operator must advise the CFIA what they want to do with the load.
  2. If the tanker of off odour egg is to be returned to the seller, the liquid is detained, the government official in the originating province is notified of the return and the tanker is resealed. The tanker of liquid is given authority to move back to the seller for disposition. If the tanker is to be dumped at a local landfill, the tanker is resealed, the inspector accompanies the tanker to the landfill, and witnesses the disposal of this product.

When the off odour product is of USA origin:

  1. Tankers of liquid egg from the USA that have an off odour are rejected, resealed and sent back to the USA.
  2. The USDA inspector and company representative at the originating station are notified of the rejected load and its subsequent return.
  3. When the product is received back into the USA the USDA inspector should advise the responsible CFIA official in writing or electronically.

The final step in this protocol is to document the entire sequence of events on an Inspection Report (CFIA/ACIA 5109) giving details of the inspection, the date, time and persons involved.

When product is in violation, documentation should be such that a record of it's detention and release of detention are completed in order to show the product was not allowed to be used as food for humans. Where more than one CFIA office is involved both offices should maintain records of both the detention and release reports.

4.6.2 Temperature Evaluation of Liquid Egg

Frequency: Daily
Record: Inspector's Daily Log
Distribution: Filed in CFIA Inspection Office

Liquid processed egg is to be stored in tanks or silos with cooling, agitation and an accurate thermometer. Egg product should be cooled as quickly as possible to reduce the growth of microorganisms. Schedule I. 1 of the Processed Egg Regulations sets out the Cooling Requirements for Liquid Processed Egg after breaking and heat treatment.

Procedure:

  1. Temperatures of the liquid held in these tanks should be taken and recorded 2 hours after the end of breaking to ensure the product meets the temperature requirements in Schedule I Column II. If the inspector is no longer in the station 2 hours after the end of breaking to perform this task, station records should be checked.
  2. Product temperatures should also be taken and recorded 2 hours after heat treatment has been concluded, to determine if the liquid meets the requirements of Schedule I Column III. This is only required when the product is leaving the pasteurizer at temperatures above 4°C.

Violation:

  1. Should product temperatures not meet the requirements, the station operator should be notified immediately and be asked to take corrective actions.
  2. The situation should be evaluated by taking the product temperature every hour to determine when the product comes into compliance.
  3. If 4 hours is required for the product to reach the required temperature, an organoleptic evaluation is performed on the product.
  4. The station operator is required to provide an action plan to correct the problem.
  5. The violation is recorded on the weekly Sanitation and Operation Report for correction.

As Required:

  • Complete a CFIA/ACIA 5109, Inspection Report of Shell Eggs/Processed Egg to record the findings from #2 and #3 of the above under violations. A copy of the CFIA/ACIA 5109 is to be attached to the appropriate inspector's daily log or kept in a separate file so long as the CFIA/ACIA 5109 can be positively linked to the appropriate inspector's daily log.
  • A copy of the completed action plan is to be attached to the appropriate inspector's daily log or kept in a separate file so long as the action plan can be positively linked to the appropriate inspector's daily log identifying the violation.

4.6.3 Pour Test

Frequency: 1/year/station
Record: Pour Test Form - Appendix II
Distribution: Filed in CFIA Inspection Office

Pour tests are done to monitor the amount of shell or other possible foreign material getting into egg products.

Procedures:

  1. A clean, sanitized edible product pail of approximately 20 litres is used to collect the sample.
  2. Samples should be collected after the filter but prior to the chill press or if there is no chill press, prior to the holding tank. Whole egg, yolk, or albumen may be selected.
  3. Fill the pail half full with product. The pail is then lidded, labelled and placed in a cooler for a minimum of four hours (preferably overnight for yolk).
  4. The product is then poured slowly into a second pail leaving a small amount of egg in the first pail.
  5. Add 5 litres of water to the pail and allow to sit for one hour.
  6. Pour water out slowly and check for shell fragments.
  7. Record results on the Pour Test Form (Appendix II)

Violations:

  1. If large particles or any significant amounts of shell are present, the station operator should be notified immediately and be asked to take corrective actions.
  2. If product from the holding tank from which the sample was taken has not been processed, an additional filter before further processing should be added.
  3. The station should review shell handling procedures and filter installation, cleaning, and repair in the breaking room, in order to correct the problem.
  4. Following a violation, a second pour test is performed as a follow-up to determine that the problem has been corrected.
  5. When a violation occurs a CFIA/ACIA 5109 should be used to record all subsequent actions by the inspector and the operator. Any violations are also to be recorded on the weekly Sanitation and Operation Report. An action plan from the station operator is requested.

4.6.4 Frozen Product Check

Frequency: Minimum 2/year/station
Record: Frozen Product Check Form - Appendix III
Distribution: Filed in the CFIA Inspection Office

Frozen products are inspected to ensure that they meet section 9.14 of the Processed Egg Regulations. Frozen processed egg products must be frozen as soon as possible after pasteurization. Product cannot be held at refrigeration temperature for several days and then be frozen and labeled as frozen product. Processed egg products labeled as frozen, must be frozen to a temperature of -12°C or less, or be hard frozen within 60 hours of pasteurization and prior to leaving a federally registered establishment.

Procedures:

  1. Freezer temperatures are recorded at the start of the 60 hour check and at approximately 24 hours, 48 hours, and 60 hours.
  2. At 60 hours the product itself is checked to ensure it is hard frozen or at -12°C or less.
  3. After 60 hours, select a container from the center of a pallet in the freezer as the sample container.
  4. In order to check the temperature of the frozen product, a hole must be drilled in the product. See the guidelines set out in the Sampling section of this manual.
  5. Once a hole has been drilled, evaluate if the product has been hard frozen. If not, insert a calibrated thermometer and determine the temperature.
  6. Results should be recorded on the 60-Hour Frozen Product Check form.

Violations:

  1. If a lot is not satisfactorily frozen at the end of the 60 hours, the station operator is immediately notified and requested to take corrective actions. Product can be spaced farther apart to permit rapid freezing, moved to a different freezer or otherwise be handled in a manner conducive to quick freezing. A written action plan is requested.
  2. If after a further 12 hours it is still not satisfactorily frozen, additional action may have to be taken. The inspector should contact their Area Egg Specialist for guidance.
  3. When product fails a 60 hour check the station will typically implement one of the following corrective actions:
    1. lower the temperature of the liquid entering the freezer
    2. lower the temperature of the freezer
    3. space the containers farther apart
    4. determine if there are areas in the freezer with poor air movement and correct
    5. increase the air circulation in the freezer
    6. reduce the production of liquid so that the freezing capacity matches liquid production.
  4. A second frozen product check is performed as a follow-up to verify the effectiveness of the company's action plan.

Notes:

  • Products to be checked should be prioritized according to freezing rates. In general, product that is tightly packed on a pallet takes longer to freeze.
  • Additional freezing rate tests may be conducted under circumstances where the inspector needs to verify that any operational changes do not adversely affect the freezing rates.

    For example:

    • a new frozen product
    • cooler space is expanded,
    • volume of product in freezer has generally increased,
    • container size/shape has changed,
    • cooling units have been changed,
    • product temperature upon entering freezer has generally increased,
    • temperature setting on freezer has increased
    • any other factor that may adversely affect the freezing rate.

4.6.5 Ingredient and Additive Check

Frequency: 6/year/station and each product that contains ingredients verified at least once per year
Record: Ingredient and Additive Check Form - Appendix IV
Distribution: Filed in the CFIA Inspection Office

Domestic and imported processed egg products are inspected to ensure that they comply with the food composition, and ingredient and additive (if applicable) declaration provisions of the Food and Drugs Act and Regulations. This monitors the use of food additives and undeclared ingredients known to be allergenic or to cause hypersensitivity reactions in certain individuals. The sections of this manual pertaining with the Food and Drugs Act and Regulations and the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act and Regulations should be consulted when doing an ingredient and additive verification check.

Procedures:

Composition Verification

  • Use the Ingredient and Additive Check Form (Appendix IV) when performing this inspection.
  • To begin, write the list of ingredients from the label in descending order on the sheet.
  • Compare each ingredient and additive on the recipe sheet to those listed on the label. Identify any additional ingredients or additive on the recipe, or any that are missing. The formulation sheet should then be returned to the station operator.
  • Some ingredients may be made up of several components, which should be listed in the third column (the breakdown of ingredients may be retrieved from ingredient listings on the container labels, or from manufacturer's spec. sheets.)
  • List the weight and percent of each ingredient and additive on the recipe sheet.
  • Watch a batch of product being produced and record the actual amounts of each ingredient and additive being added to the batch.
  • Calculated the percent of each ingredient and additive added to the batch, and determine if the percent added is approved for use.
  • Determine if any ingredient is a source of priority allergen and indicate it on the form.
  • A label from the finished product should be attached to the Ingredient and Additive Verification form.
  • The completed Ingredient and Additive Check Form and any other related work sheets are to remain in the station and is to be kept on file in the inspection office.

Check For The Following:

  • The ingredients and additives are listed on the label in descending order by weight [B.01.008 of the Food and Drug Regulations (FDR)].
  • All ingredientsand additives added are identified on the list of ingredients, by their correct common name as prescribed by the Food and Drug Regulations.
  • The components of every ingredient are declared, where required by the Food and Drug Regulations. [B.01.009]
  • The ingredients and additives added are permitted in the product by the FDR [Section B.22]. The level of these additives and ingredients is within the limits set out in Division 16 of the FDR.
  • All sources of allergens are properly declared, as described in section 7.8.1.7 of this manual.

Time Temperature Verification Check:

  • Determine the % solids of the product using station records.
  • Determine the common name of the product and the corresponding pasteurization time and temperature as set out in the Processed Egg Regulations [Schedule 1, Part 1], or as otherwise authorized by the Director, Agrifood Division.
  • Determine if the time and temperature used to pasteurize the product is correct.

Label Verification:

  • It is recommended that a full label verification bedone at the same time as the ingredient and additive check. See the Packaging, Marking and Labeling Chapter of this manual for further instructions.

Violations:

  • Record all violations, inform the station operator and request a written action plan.
  • Health and safety violations (e.g undeclared allergens, incorrect time/temperature) are critical and require immediate action. Non complaint product should be detained. The Area Egg Specialist is to be informed immediately.
  • Within one week, the station operator should submit an action plan to the inspector to outline how they plan to correct the violation.

4.6.6 On The Line Weight Checks

Frequency: Daily
Record: Inspector's Daily Log
Distribution: Filed in the CFIA Inspection Office

Smaller sized containers should be checked on an ad hoc basis to make sure that the containers are being filled to the weight that is declared. Gable top cartons, Tetra brik cartons, or boil in a bag containers may be checked.

Procedure:

  • Observe that the correct tare is established and used during filling of product.
  • Ten containers of the finished product should be randomly selected throughout the run and weighed, using the correct tare, on a calibrated scale in the station.
  • The name of the product, lot number, stated container weight, tare used, and actual weights of the 10 samples should be recorded on the inspector's daily log.

Violations:

  • Should any of the samples weigh less than the stated container weight, or if the incorrect tare is being used, the operator should immediately be notified so that corrections can be made.
  • The inspector's log should also contain records of any corrective actions taken as a result of the weight checks and discussions with the station operator.
    • Corrective actions may include:
      • Adjustments to filling equipment
      • Reworking of underweight packages by station personnel
  • Under weight retail packaged may be detained

4.6.7 Net Quantity Verification

Frequency: 2 Domestic prepackaged products/year/station
1 Import prepackaged product/year/importer
Record: Net Quantity Verification Worksheet - (This document is intended for internal use. CFIA staff can access this document using RDIMS number 1744205)
Distribution: Filed in the CFIA Inspection Office

Net quantity verifications are performed to ensure that the net quantity declared on the label is the actual amount of product contained in the package. This is done by conducting inspections using the Average System of net quantity determination.

Required Equipment:

  • Setra scale or equivalent
  • Reference weights (calibrated annually)
  • Statistical calculator or computer equipped with appropriate software
  • Volumetric kit
  • Consumer Packaging and Labelling Regulations (CPLR) and/or Weights and Measures Regulations

Procedure:

Violations:

  • When a net quantity violation is found, immediately notify the plant manager in writing, including a description of the affected lot, the violation and applicable legislation.
  • If the product is destined for retail, the lot is placed under detention until the operator has identified an acceptable corrective action and the non-compliance has been corrected.
  • If the product is not destined for retail, the inspector should try to achieve compliance in any way available other than detention. CFIA inspectors do not have the authority to detain non-retail products where a net quantity violation is found as these products fall under the Weights and Measures Act. If the operator fails to take action, refer the issue to Industry Canada, or where the product is destined for export, refuse to sign the export certificate.
  • Acceptable corrective action may be:
    • Rework and repackage the product.
    • Sort the lot. Reinspection will be necessary before releasing the product.
    • Destroy the product.
    • Donate the product to a registered charity.

4.6.8 Reworked Product

Stations wishing to rework product containing ingredients that are allergens or potential health concerns (e.g, milk ingredients) must declare these ingredients on the new product label.

Defrosting of frozen rework product should be carried out in a cooler.

4.6.9 Extended Shelf Life Products

The extended shelf life protocol is intended for liquid processed egg that has a shelf life claim of more than 28 days.

The objective of this protocol is to outline the criteria required to be met by the processor in order to demonstrate that processed egg marked with an extended shelf life (ESL) claim can meet the requirements of the Processed Egg Regulations up to the end of the claimed shelf life. See appendix V.

4.6.10 Product Loading and Transportation

Processed egg product should only be loaded into tankers or onto trailers that meet the following requirements:

  • Are clean and suitable for the transportation of food. A cleaning certificate should be available prior to loading any tanker.
  • Transport vehicles must have the capacity to maintain the processed egg in a state that prevents its deterioration.
  • Processed egg may only be conveyed from a registered processed egg station in a vehicle that is equipped, where applicable, to maintain the processed egg in are refigerated or frozen state. Dried product must be kept dry.
  • Product should be loaded in a manner that will not cause damage to the product during loading or during the trip (i.e. shifting).
  • Tankers must be sealed (with metal CFIA seals) before leaving the establishment for biosecurity reasons. For intraprovincial movement, tankers can be sealed by the station operator.
  • Egg products shipped on a trailer or similar types of conveyance shall not be shipped with incompatible products as per section 9(23)(e) of the Processed Egg Regulations (PER).

Interprovincial Movement of Unpasteurized Product

  • The inspector at origin must fill out an Inspection Report of Shell/Processed Egg (CFIA/ACIA 5109), indicating:
    • station of origin
    • station of destination
    • date of departure and expected date of arrival
    • type of product
    • the temperature at time of sealing
    • seal numbers
    • whether the product received continuous inspection coverage for eligibility to export to the USA.
    • any additional information required by the inspector at the destination station.
  • The form should be faxed to the inspector at the destination station.

For Exports

  • See the Processed Egg Export chapter of this manual.

4.6.11 Inedible

4.6.11.1 Denatured Product

In stations that denature inedible egg, the inspector must ensure that the product is properly denatured during production. Denatured product must have the appearance or characteristics of being unsuitable for human consumption. Disposition of denatured product does not have to be controlled.

Should the inspector encounter a violation, the inedible egg is to be detained, the station operator notified and a written corrective action requested.

Commonly accepted denaturants include caramel colour, anisor and dye/ink.

4.6.11.2 Non-Denatured Product

Inedible egg which is not denatured must be controlled and disposed of to the satisfaction of the inspector. The station operator must provide the inspector with their inedible control program giving the weight of product produced and the name and address of the end users. When inedible product is shipped from the station, the inspector is to be provided with weight shipped, date and name and address of the end user. A CFIA inspector is to verify that the buyer is appropriate for receiving inedible egg.

At the frequency indicated in the Operational Work Plans, an inspector is to visit the end user location to verify the weight of product received, and to ensure that the product is not being used for human consumption. The inspector must complete a Inspection Report of Shell/Processed Egg (CFIA/ACIA 5109) after each visit.

Should the inspector encounter a violation, the inedible egg is to be detained, the station operator notified and a written corrective action requested

Interprovincial Movement

Non-denatured inedible product that will be moving inter-provincially must be:

  • moved under detention
  • shipped in a container that is sealed by a CFIA inspector

The CFIA inspector at origin is to fax a copy of the detention to the inspector at destination along with the date the load is leaving the destination, estimated time of arrival and volume, so that the inspector in the receiving province can remove the seal and release the product. A copy of the release from detention is sent to the inspector at origin.

Appendix I - Shell Egg Grading Requirements

Shell Egg Grading Requirements Table
Pre-Grade Nest-Run
(max. 15%)
Grade A Grade B Grade C
Albumen Average H.U 67 and above. N/A Reasonably firm No Requirements No Requirements
Yolk N/A N/A Indistinct yolk outline.
A round yolk that is reasonably well centered.
Distinct yolk outline, moderately oblong, floats freely. Slight degree of germ development. Prominent yolk outline, definitely oblong, does not adhere to shell membrane
Air Cell No more than 5% with more than 5 mm. N/A Maximum 5 mm Maximum 9 mm No requirements
Blood or Meat Spots (Leakers) 2.5% Leakers Maximum 3% that are leakers or rejects. None None Maximum 3 mm in diameter.
Dirt and Stains Dirt: (manure)

No more than 5% between 160 mm² and ⅓ of shell.

No more than 2.5% with more than ⅓ of shell.
Stain: no more than 5% with 2 of shell stained

Dirt:

No more than 5% where the dirt is more than 160 mm².

No Dirt

Stain: Maximum 3 stains aggregate area maximum 25 mm².

No Dirt

Stain: Aggregate area maximum 320 mm².

No dirt

Stain: Aggregate area maximum ⅓ of the shell surface.

Shape
Roughness
Ridges
Maximum 10%
Normal or nearly normal in shape. May have rough areas and ridges other than heavy ridges.
N/A Normal or nearly normal in shape. May have rough areas and ridges other than heavy ridges. Slightly abnormal. Has rough areas and definite ridges No requirements
Cracks Maximum 10% Maximum 10% Uncracked Uncracked May be cracked but not leaking.

Appendix II - Pour Test Form

Date: space

Station: space

Filter Tested: Whole Egg: space Yolk: space Albumen: space

Procedure:

  • A clean, sanitized edible product pail of approximately 20 litres is used to collect the sample.
  • Samples should be collected after the filter but prior to the chill press or if there is no chill press, prior to the holding tank. Whole egg, yolk, or albumen may be selected.
  • Fill the pail half full with product. The pail is then lidded, labelled and placed in a cooler for a minimum of four hours (preferably overnight for yolk).
  • The product is then poured slowly into a second pail leaving a small amount of egg in the first pail.
  • Add 5 litres of water to the pail and allow to sit for one hour.
  • Pour water out slowly and check for shell fragments.

Results:

Are there any large shell fragments? Yesspace Nospace

If Yes, is the filter in good repair? Yesspace Nospace

If No, explain?

space

space

If Yes, was the sleeve cleaned properly? Yesspace Nospace

How often is the filter broken down?

Remarks:

space

space

space

Signed:

Appendix III - 60 Hour Frozen Product Check

Name of Station: space

Product: space

Lot Number: space

Start Time: space

Finish Time: space

Type of Packaging: space

Weight per Unit: space

Temperature of freezer

Temperature Start space

24 - hour check space

48 - hour check space

60 - hour check space

Is the Product Hard Frozen? space
Product must be hard frozen 60 hours after pasteurization

Odour: space

Remarks:

space

space

space

space

space

Appendix IV - Ingredient and Additives Check

Date: space

Establishment #: space

Name of Product: space

Ingredient and Additives Check sample table
Ingredients and Additives as listed in the ingredient list on the primary package Ingredients and additives as listed on the outer container (if applicable) Ingredient and Additive Quantities listed on the recipe. Ingredient and Additive Quantities observed added to batch. % of batch Source of allergen?
Ingredients/ Additive Quantity Ingredients/ Additive Quantity
Total: Total: 100%
Overall Evaluation
Yes No
1. Are the ingredients observed added to the batch listed on the label in descending order?
2. Are all the ingredients (additives) approved for use in this product?
3. Are all the ingredients (additives) added, within the permitted levels?
4. Are all sources of allergens properly declared on the label? (See section 7.8.1.7)

(Eggs, milk, mustard, peanuts, fish, crustaceans, shellfish, sesame seeds, soya, tree nuts, wheat, sulphites, gluten)

If no was answered for any question: List the ingredients or additives not in compliance and the course of action taken in the remarks section.

Note: An undeclared or improperly declared allergen could cause serious health consequences and should be dealt with diligently.

Percent Solids

Per formula: space%

As mixed: space%

Pasteurization Time/Temperature (Schedule 1, PER):

Remarks:

space

space

space

space

Inspector's Name/Signature space

Appendix V - Protocol For Extended Shelf Life Claims For Processed Egg

This protocol is intended for liquid processed egg that has a shelf life claim of more than 28 days.

The objective of this protocol is to outline the criteria required to be met by the processor in order to demonstrate that processed egg marked with an extended shelf life (ESL) claim can meet the requirements of the Processed Egg Regulations up to the end of the claimed shelf life.

In order for a station to be permitted to make and maintain an extended shelf life (ESL) claim on processed egg, they must comply with this protocol, which is, in addition to the requirements as set out in the Processed Egg Regulations for the quality assurance program, production, packaging and marking of processed egg.

1. Obtain a Letter Of No-Objection To Use An ESL Claim

1.1 Submission package

The following information is to be submitted to the Area Egg Specialist for review :

  • 1.1.1 Description of the product (including % solids and pH), process and equipment to be used, packaging (size and description ), formulation and pasteurization (temperature and holding time)
  • 1.1.2 Microbial analysis results demonstrating compliance with the Processed Egg Regulations for Aerobic Colony Count (ACC), coliforms, Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes:
    • for 5 consecutive production lots (10 samples per lot tested as one composite) tested both at:
    • day 10, and
      1. the end of the claimed shelf life
      2. performed by a laboratory accredited by the Standards Council of Canada (SCC), using methods on the scope of their accreditation
  • 1.1.3 Results demonstrating that the product remained organoleptically satisfactory throughout the claimed shelf life.
  • 1.1.4 Description on how the quality assurance program of the station will monitor this product for compliance with the Processed Egg Regulations, and confirming that all data will be available to the CFIA Inspector for review upon request.

1.2 Authorization to produce

Following an acceptable review of the submission package, the Area Egg Specialist will issue an authorization to produce the product labeled with the requested extended shelf life claim, in order to allow the station to build a history of compliance (item 1.3)

1.3 History of compliance

Following the authorization to produce, the station operator is to collect and submit the following information to the Area Egg Specialist for review:

  • 1.3.1 Microbial analysis results demonstrating compliance with the Processed Egg Regulations for Aerobic Colony Count (ACC), coliforms, Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes:
    • for 5 consecutive production lots (10 samples per lot tested as one composite) tested at the end of the claimed shelf life
      • day 10, and
      • the end of the claimed shelf life
    • performed by a laboratory accredited by the SCC, using methods on the scope of their accreditation
  • 1.3.2 Results demonstrating that the product remained organoleptically
    satisfactory throughout the claimed shelf life.

1.4 Letter of No-Objection to Use an ESL Claim

Following an acceptable review of the information requested in item 1.3, the Area Egg Specialist will issue a letter of no-objection to use an ESL claim for the specific product and process described in item 1.1.1.

2.0 Follow-Up To A No-Objection To Use An ESL Claim

The station operator must be able to demonstrate that the process, equipment, and procedures, including cleaning, sterilization, pasteurization (temperature and holding time), cooling and packaging used for each production lot are consistent with those described in item 1.1.1. If changes are made to any of the preceding items, the station operator may be required to submit additional data in order to maintain their extended shelf life claim.

3.0 Markings

In addition to the regular markings on the label for extended shelf life products, the following is recommended: Use by xdays after opening.

4.0 Non-Compliance With The Processed Eggs Regulations

4.1 If the QA monitoring program identifies non-compliance with the Processed Egg Regulations:

  • the CFIA inspector is to be notified immediately,
  • the station operator is to investigate the cause of the problem,
  • an action plan which clearly states what steps will be taken to correct the problem is to be submitted to the CFIA inspector,
  • a history of compliance is to be re-established as per item 1.3, and
  • results sent to the Area Egg Specialist.

4.2 The CFIA may rescind the letter of no-objection for an extended shelf life claim if the station operator fails to demonstrate continued compliance with this protocol.

Appendix VI - Extended Shelf Life Protocol Checklist

Initial Request

Box Data received from five consecutive lots (10 samples per lot tested as one composite)

Box Day 10 Micro: ACC, coliforms, Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes

Box End of shelf life Micro: ACC, coliforms, Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes

Box Organoleptic

Box Data review by CFIA

Process

Box Written procedures

Box Monitoring Records

Box Monitoring by CFIA

Box Resubmit after changes to procedures

History Of Compliance

Box End of shelf life Micro: ACC, coliforms, Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes

Box Data received from five consecutive lots (10 samples per lot tested as one composite)

Box Organoleptic

Box Monitoring of results by CFIA

CFIA Sampling

Product Non-Compliance

Box Recall initiated by the station operator

Box Investigation of cause

Box Re-establish history of compliance

Recall Procedures

Box Written recall program

Box Verification of program

Box CFIA monitors recall

Quality Recalls

Box Written recall program

Box Verification of program

Box CFIA informed

Markings

Box Expiry date

Box Keep refrigerated at 0 to 4°C

Box Use by space days after opening (suggested)

Failure To Comply With Protocol

Box Use of claim withdrawn by CFIA

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