2013-2014 Departmental Performance Report
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

This section details the CFIA's planned activities for its strategic outcome as informed by a number of factors, including Government and Agency priorities, the Agency's Corporate Risk Profile, and the application of lessons learned. Lessons learned may be derived from a variety of sources, including: internal and external audits; internal program evaluations; stakeholder feedback and consultation; information from performance measurement (including quality management); and structured post-incident analysis following significant events such as an animal disease outbreak or a serious food safety recall. This section features key areas on which the CFIA focused its efforts during the last fiscal year.

Assessment of Performance Targets

Performance targets for compliance rates are qualitative or quantitative goals set by the CFIA that provide a basis for measuring the performance of regulated parties and the Agency toward achieving expected results. The targets in this report are for critical program areas and based either on historical averages of actual performance or on the expected results of effective programming (e.g. rate of industry compliance with regulatory standards). The CFIA has assessed the extent to which performance has met or exceeded established targets and provided analysis when performance has fallen below targets. Targets for programs that monitor activities are set differently than for programs that focus on specific areas of non-compliance. In terms of compliance rates, the CFIA deems a performance variance of +/- 1% (percent) to be "Met".

2.1 Strategic Outcome: A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base

Mitigating risks to food safety is the CFIA's highest priority. Safeguarding the health and well-being of Canadians, our environment and economy is the driving force behind the design and development of CFIA programs. The CFIA, in collaboration and partnership with industry, consumers, and federal, provincial and municipal organizations, continued to work towards protecting Canadians from preventable health risks related to food and zoonotic diseases.

Recognizing that the current and future economic prosperity of the Canadian agriculture and forestry sectors relies on a healthy and sustainable animal and plant resource base, the CFIA continued to improve its program design and delivery in the animal health and plant resource areas in order to minimize and manage risks. In an effort to protect the natural environment from invasive animal and plant diseases and plant pests, the CFIA performed extensive work related to the protection of environmental biodiversity.

The CFIA also focused on several horizontal initiatives aimed at contributing to the protection of consumers. Examples of such initiatives included the elaboration of the approach for continued advancement in food labeling modernization, an increased focus on transparency, and the continued delivery of many of its day-to-day operational activities, including public food recall and allergy alert notices, and import border blitzes designed to intercept imported food items that may pose a health threat to Canadians.

The CFIA began implementing its multi-year project of establishing 16 centres of expertise (CoE) across Canada. Each CoE will offer greater consistency in program interpretation and delivery to front-line inspectors of the CFIA, as well as regulated parties, while at the same time consolidating program and administrative expertise in order to improve the effectiveness, efficiency, and quality of service delivery. Each CoE will deal with issues specific to a certain area of expertise. Much of the effort in this area for 2013-14 was spent in building the infrastructure in support of CoEs.

To successfully deliver on its strategic outcome, the CFIA has developed a robust risk management culture, and fosters the use of it throughout the Agency. As such, the CFIA continually monitors and assesses its operating environment in order to be aware of threats and opportunities concerning the achievement of its desired outcome. A cornerstone of its risk management process is the development of an Agency-wide Corporate Risk Profile (CRP).

In order to mitigate risks and achieve its strategic outcome, the Agency, through the actions of its programs (Food Safety, Animal Health and Zoonotics, Plant Resources, International Collaboration and Technical Agreements), concentrated its efforts for 2013-14 on the delivery of key initiatives that support the CFIA's four priorities:

  • Increasing focus on prevention which will provide an opportunity to minimize risks to human, animal and ecosystem health;
  • Enhancing the CFIA's role as an effective regulator by focusing on service excellence;
  • Adapting and evolving to meet new demands and expectations with a focus on internal performance excellence; and
  • Focussing on people who are supported by training and tools.

2.1.1 Food Safety Program

The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Food Safety Program

2013-14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Total Authorities Available for use 2013–14 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
312,185,374 352,681,060 394,119,558 364,310,525 11,629,465

Human Resources (FTEs) – Food Safety Program

2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
3,218 3,296 78

The increases from Planned to Actual Spending of $11.6 million and 78 FTEs are mainly due to: Agency investments in its transformation agenda and food safety priorities; additional resources received from the government for various food safety activities, including the establishment of an Inspection Verification System; incremental Food Safety Modernization activities; expenditures made on behalf of the Treasury Board (such as parental and maternity allowances, entitlements on cessation of service, etc.); as well as the transfer of resources from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada as part of a multi-year Memorandum of Understanding on the Growing Forward 2 policy framework.

In addition, the Agency made a concerted effort to improve the alignment of program expenditures and FTEs. As such, a portion of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Actual Spending was aligned to the Food Safety Program; while all BSE Planned Spending was aligned to the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program, contributing to the overall increase in Actual Spending over Planned Spending in the Food Safety Program.

Table 2-1a: Summary of Performance by Program: Food Safety Program

Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Number of commodity areas where federally-registered establishments meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met 5 out of 6 met Table Note 6
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class I food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 100% 100% Met
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class II food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 95% 95% Met
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Number of commodity areas where domestic food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met 6 out of 6 met
Number of commodity areas where imported food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met 5 out of 6 met Table Note 7

These are roll-up indicators from the Sub-Program level.

Table Notes

Table Note 6

The Dairy Sub-Program did not meet its target. For 2013-14, in order to harmonize the approach of calculating non-compliance across the Agri-food programs, the percentage non-compliance of dairy establishments includes all facilities that were issued a non-compliance letter. In previous years, dairy establishments that implemented corrective action plans in response to letters were not included in the calculation. For example, the percent compliance of inspected registered dairy establishments in 2012/13 was 100%.

This change in approach to the calculation for dairy establishments led to a very small decrease in the compliance rate (96%). It should be noted that all of the dairy establishments that were issued non-compliance letters submitted corrective action plans that were verified by follow-up inspection.

Return to table note 6 referrer

Table Note 7

The other Sub-Program that did not meet its target is Fish and Seafood. The non-compliance refers only to imported fish and seafood products. Of all imported fish and seafood inspections that were deemed non-compliant, the percentage of tests failing drug residues in farmed fish has decreased from 37.5% in 2012-13 to 12.5% in 2013-14. However, of all fish inspections deemed non-compliant, container integrity was the most frequent reason, increasing from 18.8% in 2012-13 to 31.3% in 2013-14. There were a total of ten rejections for imported fish and seafood. However, there was no trend relative to a particular product, processor, or country of origin. Reasons for product rejections included bacterial contamination with Listeria monocytogenes, decomposition, drug residues, environmental contaminants and misuse of additives. There is no apparent systematic problem that is causing this non-compliance.

Compliance levels are for products as imported to Canada, prior to release for domestic sale. Products are held while testing is conducted and only compliant products are allowed into the Canadian market. In addition, future shipments of similar products are held for testing until four consecutive compliant results are achieved.

Compliance of imported fish products has historically been between 85 to 90%. However, the CFIA continues to set an ambitious target of 95% and has been taking steps towards achieving it over time by working with fish importers and as part of the overall modernization of its food program. In addition, Budget 2014 announced ongoing funding to strengthen Canada's food safety system and increase oversight with respect to certain commodities including fish and seafood.

Return to table note 7 referrer

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Continuing to implement the Agency Transformation initiative by modernizing food inspection

In 2013-14, the CFIA continued to progress on its transformation agenda that includes adopting a risk-based system and modernizing the inspection system and oversight activities. Expanding beyond food and consumer protection, the CFIA developed the Integrated Agency Inspection Model (iAIM) Endnote xvii to improve the food inspection model and implement a single risk-based inspection approach across all commodities. The draft iAIM was posted for internal and external consultations with stakeholders in the fall of 2013.

In addition, to adapt to current changes in global supply chains and advances in science and technology, the CFIA worked with government partners and universities to develop a risk assessment (RA) model. The RA model will assist the CFIA with identifying and characterizing hazards, and determining the probability and/or impact of a food safety incident.

The CFIA continued to implement the pathogen reduction initiative to decrease the incidence and economic impact of foodborne illness by reducing pathogen contamination of meat and poultry. In collaboration with stakeholders, the Agency undertook the first national microbiological baseline study to estimate the prevalence and concentration of Campylobacter and Salmonella in broiler chicken and chicken meat produced across Canada. Samples were collected and analyzed in 2013, and results will be presented to stakeholders during consultation sessions in June 2014.

The CFIA also made progress towards modernizing its scientific equipment and laboratories. Since May 2013, improvements to the food laboratory structure in Toronto and St-Hyacinthe progressed well through the engineering and design phases.

Preparing for the 2015 coming into force of the Safe Food for Canadians Act

The Act provides the legislative basis to simplify and consolidate food regulations for a single, consistent approach to strengthening overall food inspection in Canada. As part of the Safe Food for Canadians Action Plan (SFCAP), the CFIA consulted and held discussions on renewing and modernizing food regulations. The CFIA launched the consultation process at the 2013 Food Safety Regulatory Forum. The Forum included representatives from industry, other governments, and the academic community. Proposed regulations, resulting from this consultative process, are expected to be published in the Canada Gazette Part I in the fall of 2014 and final publication is expected in mid-2015.

To support industry stakeholders, particularly small- and medium-sized enterprises, through focused efforts to promote compliance, illustrative interpretive guidance documents as well as example model systems for the new food inspection regulations have also been developed.

The CFIA launched the new Pre-Requisite Employment Program (PREP) Endnote xviii, a comprehensive orientation program designed to provide specific knowledge, skills and attitudes required by inspectors to be successful on the job. To date, PREP School has graduated a total of 170 inspectors. In parallel to this project, the CFIA also launched the Supervisor School in September 2013 to enhance food safety culture through strong and effective supervision.

Food labelling information for Canadians

Following extensive consultations with consumers, inspectors, and industry stakeholders, the CFIA successfully implemented the Online Labelling Tool (OLT) in March 2014. The tool provides consumers and industry with user-friendly access to information regarding regulatory requirements for labelling food, such as consumer specific information and education on food labelling.

Furthermore, the CFIA continued to implement the Food Labelling Modernization Initiative Endnote xix to promote an innovative food labelling system, so as to improve service delivery and align with other stakeholders' initiatives, such as Health Canada (HC's) Nutrition Labelling initiatives. In 2013-14, the first phase of engagement with stakeholders was completed. A report outlining key consultation outcomes and a discussion paper was presented at the Safe Food Regulatory Forum in June 2014. The forum launched the second consultation phase that will take place in the summer of 2014.

Collaborating with partners and stakeholders to protect Canadians' health

CFIA collaborated with HC, PHAC, and provincial and territorial partners to develop a strategy on an information network to link federal and provincial food safety authorities and private food laboratories residing across Canada. This information network will strengthen national laboratory capacity to swiftly and effectively respond to food safety incidents and emergencies, so as to better protect consumers from foodborne hazards and will be integrated through a common data sharing platform among food safety authorities. The continued development and implementation of this information network over the next five years will further strengthen and modernize Canada's food safety regime.

In an effort to draw on the strength of Agency partners and promote partnership, the CFIA entered into collaborative agreements or embarked on collaborative projects with:

  • Genome Canada and Alberta Innovates to explore biosolutions on Listeria monocytogenes genomics;
  • Genome Alberta and Alberta Innovates to look for biosolutions on E.coli genomics; and,
  • HC to analyze Campylobacter genomics. This project was completed in 2013-14.

2.1.1.1 Sub-Program: Meat and Poultry

The Meat and Poultry sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with meat and poultry and their products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that meat, poultry and their products meet health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. The program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices related to labelling compliance for pre-packaged meat products, and audits the delivery of a grading program based on objective meat quality and retail yield standards. The Meat and Poultry sub-program supports confidence in Canada's meat and poultry and their products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program: Meat and Poultry
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
182,678,352 190,270,609 7,592,257
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program: Meat and Poultry
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
1,807 1,851 44

The increases from Planned to Actual Spending of $7.6 million and 44 FTEs are mainly due to: Agency investments to support food safety priorities such as the dedication of incremental resources to maintain increased frequency of food inspections in meat processing establishments; establishment of an Inspection Verification System; incremental Food Safety Modernization activities; and expenditures made on behalf of the Treasury Board (such as parental and maternity allowances, entitlements on cessation of service, etc.).

In addition, the Agency made a concerted effort to improve the alignment of program expenditures and FTEs. As such, a portion of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Actual Spending was aligned to the Meat and Poultry Sub-Program, while all BSE Planned Spending was aligned to the Animal Health Program, contributing to the increase in Actual Spending over Planned Spending in the Meat and Poultry Sub-Program.

Table 2-1b: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Meat and Poultry
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Federally registered meat and poultry establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered meat and poultry establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 98% Met
Meat and poultry products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 95% Met
Percentage of tested imported meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Revising E.coli 0157:H7 policies to continue to maintain high food safety culture

Following an in-depth review of the XL Foods Inc. incident and recall, the CFIA published, on May 17, 2013, a revised policy on the control of E.coli 0157:H7 contamination in raw beef products Endnote xx. The revised policy requires establishments to develop and implement a High Event Protocol (HEP) in the event of a contamination. In addition, the CFIA continued to deliver additional training to inspection staff in relation to E.coli controls. Sampling activities for E.coli 0157:H7 in beef trims have also significantly increased in federally-inspected meat plants.

Ensuring adherence to Listeria policies

Throughout the year, the CFIA continued to enforce HC's revised Listeria Policy. Inspections were conducted to verify the effectiveness of industry adherence to the policy and controls related to Listeria.

Provincial oversight of meat inspection

The CFIA implemented changes agreed upon with provinces by returning provincial meat inspection activities to the provinces of British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. There will be no impact on food safety, as provinces will be delivering the required inspection services.

2.1.1.2 Sub-Program: Egg

The Egg sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with egg and egg products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that eggs and egg products are graded according to relevant governing acts and regulations and that they comply with the requirements of the said acts and regulations. The program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and advertising practices meet the requirements for pre-packaged egg products. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's egg and egg products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program: Egg
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
10,304,909 10,549,629 244,720
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program: Egg
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
85 87 2
Table 2-1c: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Egg
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Federally registered shell egg establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered shell egg establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 97% Footnote 8 Met
Shell egg and egg products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 97% Met
Percentage of tested imported shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 99% Met

2.1.1.3 Sub-Program: Dairy

The Dairy sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with dairy and dairy products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that dairy and dairy products meet health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the governing acts and regulations. The program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices by verifying that labelling for pre-packaged dairy products meets the requirements as set out in the acts and regulations. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's dairy products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program: Dairy
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
13,969,454 14,301,199 331,745
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program: Dairy
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
119 122 3
Table 2-1d: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Dairy
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Federally registered dairy establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered dairy establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 96% Not Met
Dairy products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 99% Met
Percentage of tested imported dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Dairy Sub-Program did not meet its target. This can be attributed to the fact that, in previous years, dairy establishments were deemed non-compliant (Not Met) only after they failed to appropriately implement corrective actions following an initial inspection. For the first time this year, the number of non-compliant establishments at the time of initial inspection is included in the calculation of non-compliance. This change in approach of calculating non-compliance was implemented in 2013-14 to harmonize the method of calculation and reporting of non-compliance across the Agri-food programs. This change in approach led to a very small decrease in its compliance rate (96%).

It should be noted that all of the dairy establishments that were issued non-compliance letters submitted corrective action plans that were verified by follow-up inspection.

2.1.1.4 Sub-Program: Fish and Seafood

The Fish and Seafood sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with fish and seafood products processed in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. It achieves its objectives by developing product and process standards and ensuring that products, importers and domestic industry comply with quality, safety and identity of fish and seafood requirements through verification of compliance with the governing acts and regulations. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's fish and seafood products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program: Fish and Seafood
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
48,941,546 50,103,805 1,162,259
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program: Fish and Seafood
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
417 427 10
Table 2-1e: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Fish and Seafood
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Federally registered fish and seafood establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fish and seafood establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 99% Met
Fish and seafood products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98% Met
Percentage of tested imported fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 85% Not Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Of all imported fish and seafood inspections that were deemed non-compliant, the percentage of tests failing drug residues in farmed fish has decreased from 37.5% in 2012-13 to 12.5% in 2013-14. However, of all fish inspections deemed non-compliant, container integrity was the most frequent reason, increasing from 18.8% in 2012-13 to 31.3% in 2013-14. There were a total of ten rejections for imported fish and seafood. However, there was no trend relative to a particular product, processor, or country of origin. Reasons for product rejections included bacterial contamination with Listeria monocytogenes, decomposition, drug residues, environmental contaminants and misuse of additives. There is no apparent systematic problem that is causing this non-compliance.

Compliance levels are for products as imported to Canada, prior to release for domestic sale. Products are held while testing is conducted and only compliant products are allowed into the Canadian market. In addition, future shipments of similar products are held for testing until four consecutive compliant results are achieved.

Compliance of imported fish products has historically been between 85 to 90%. However, the CFIA continues to set an ambitious target of 95% and has been taking steps towards achieving it over time by working with fish importers and as part of the overall modernization of its food program. In addition, Budget 2014 announced ongoing funding to strengthen Canada's food safety system and increase oversight with respect to certain commodities including fish and seafood.

2.1.1.5 Sub-Program: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with fresh fruits and vegetables and their products produced in Canada or imported for consumption. It achieves its objectives by verifying that products meet all stipulated health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program mitigates unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and net quantity requirements for pre-packaged Fresh Fruit and Vegetable products are adhered to. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's fresh fruit and vegetable products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
24,581,048 25,164,796 583,748
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
210 215 5
Table 2-1f: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Federally registered fresh fruit and vegetables establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fresh fruit and vegetable establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 97% Footnote 9 Met
Fresh fruit and vegetable products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fresh fruit and vegetable samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% 99% Met
Percentage of tested imported fresh fruit and vegetables samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% 97% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

New inspection and oversight for fresh produce safety was initiated under the Fresh Fruit and Vegetables (FFV) program modernization project to support planned enhanced funding. This project aimed to enhance inspections of FFV establishments for food safety, to help minimize potential health risks related to the consumption of fresh fruit and vegetables. These inspections focus on industry's implementation of good manufacturing practices, good handling practices, and preventive food safety controls; label verification; and microbiological and chemical residue sampling and testing programs. Under this project, a master list of FFV establishments has been created, and the CFIA has developed inspection tools for inspectors, and communication materials. Both were made available to industry through the CFIA website.

Budget 2014 announced ongoing funding to strengthen Canada's food safety system and increase oversight with respect to certain commodities including fresh fruit and vegetables.

2.1.1.6 Sub-Program: Processed Products

The Processed Products sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with processed products, including honey and maple products, which are produced in Canada or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that processed products comply with health and food safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program minimizes unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and net quantity requirements for pre-packaged processed products are adhered to. The program supports confidence in Canada's processed products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program: Processed Products
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
11,132,465 11,396,838 264,373
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program: Processed Products
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
96 98 2
Table 2-1g: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Processed Products
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Federally registered processed products establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered processed products establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 98% Met
Processed products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98% Met
Percentage of tested imported processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 95% Met

2.1.1.7 Sub-Program: Imported and Manufactured Food Products

The Imported and Manufactured Food Products sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with food commodities that are regulated by the relevant governing acts and regulations. The CFIA and provincial/territorial governments share the jurisdiction over IMFP because the sector includes a large variety of foods that are traded intra-provincially or inter-provincially. This program achieves its objectives by verifying that these products comply with the health, food safety, and consumer protection requirements. The program mitigates unfair market practices by verifying that requirements related to net quantity, composition, claims, labelling, and advertising of these foods are adhered to and by enforcing the governing acts and regulations. Through enforcement of the acts and regulations, the program supports confidence in Canada's imported and manufactured food products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program: Imported Manufactured Food Products
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
61,073,286 62,523,649 1,450,363
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program: Imported Manufactured Food Products
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
484 496 12
Table 2-1h: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Imported and Manufactured Food Products
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Risks to the Canadian public associated with imported and manufactured food (IMF) products are mitigated Percentage of major health risks in the imported and manufactured food sector that are addressed through the annual update to food safety inspection programs 95% 100% Met
Percentage of inspected IMF products with accurate net quantity, composition, labelling and advertising 70% 74% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The CFIA continued consultations on the proposed Imported Food Sector Products Regulations under Food Regulatory Modernization. The proposed regulations aim to introduce food safety and licensing requirements for importers in the Imported Food Sector, which will enable better identification of unsafe foods and ingredients and allow the CFIA to identify and engage importers. The CFIA also developed training materials associated with the revised compliance verification (CVS) inspection process.

2.1.2 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, limiting risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instils confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Financial Resources (dollars) – Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

2013-14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Total Authorities Available for use 2013–14 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
131,587,718 131,999,425 195,453,317 187,939,265 55,939,840

Human Resources (FTEs) – Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
1,128 1,074 (54)

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $55.9 million is predominantly due to a significant increase in statutory compensation payments, in accordance with the Health of Animals Act. The transfer of resources from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada as part of a multi-year Memorandum of Understanding on the Growing Forward 2 policy framework and expenditures made on behalf of the Treasury Board (such as parental and maternity allowances, entitlements on cessation of service, etc.) also contributed to the increase.

The decrease of 54 FTEs from Planned to Actual primarily relates to the concerted effort of the Agency to improve the alignment of program expenditures and FTEs. As such, a portion of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Actual Spending was aligned to the Food Safety Program and International Collaboration and Technical Agreement Program, while all BSE Planned Spending was aligned to the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program. The application of reductions stemming from savings initiatives also contributed to the decrease. The Agency has achieved these savings mainly through efficiencies and has not reduced staff or cut programs that would in any way impact food safety or place the health and safety of Canadians at risk.

Table 2-2a: Summary of Performance by Program: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 Entries 0 Entries Met
Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic disease 100% 100% Met
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of legally exported animal and animal product shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirements 99% 100% Met
Canada's status on the OIE Footnote 10 disease risk status lists remains either "free, controlled risk, or negligible risk" Status maintained Status maintained Met
Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal disease 100% 100% Met
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases Manuals for CFIA officials are updated as needed All necessary manual updates are completed All necessary manual updates were completed Met
Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises in which CFIA participates 9 11 Met
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of detections of reportable transboundary diseases and significant emerging diseases in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashion 100% 100% Met
Percentage of cases where CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundary or significant emerging disease 100% 100% Met

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Implementing Agency transformation

As part of the Agency Transformation initiative, the Animal Health Program began consolidating and modernizing its legislative and regulatory framework to:

  • improve consistency in interpretation and enforcement of regulations;
  • streamline processes;
  • integrate science more rigorously into its decision-making; and,
  • provide single-window access for services to clients.

For example, proposed changes under the proposed Agricultural Growth Act, affecting the Feeds Act and Health of Animals Act, will contribute to overall Canadian economic growth by enhancing trade opportunities and reducing red tape.

Leveraging relationships to prepare for disease outbreaks, such as Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea (PED)

The CFIA proactively engaged other federal departments, levels of government, and the private sector to reassess the appropriate response to animal diseases. The Agency also worked with the Ontario Veterinary College to develop potential public policy responses of varying levels with respect to animal diseases. To allow for a good governance system should a disease outbreak occur, the CFIA continued to participate in the National Farmed Animal Health and Welfare Council with PHAC and AAFC.

The CFIA worked closely with partners within Ontario and the U.S. to manage and seek a resolution to the PED outbreak, a pig viral disease. Despite having no impact on human health, PED potentially has serious repercussions on the swine industry. While provincial authorities led the PED investigation and response, the CFIA provided significant assistance and support. The investigation is ongoing and the CFIA continues to monitor and address issues as required.

Strengthening trade relations and market access

The Agency contributed to positive trade relationships and improved market access in 2013-14 by negotiating over 100 new and amended export certificates for live animals and a similar number of new or amended export certificates for animal products and by-products. Additionally, the CFIA continued to build on the January 2013 Canada-U.S. Zoning Agreement by creating an implementation framework which is now undergoing external consultations, under the joint leadership of the CFIA and the USDA.

2.1.2.1 Sub-Program: Terrestrial Animal Health

The Terrestrial Animal Health sub-program aims to prevent the entry of reportable, foreign animal diseases and the spread of reportable domestic animal diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program achieves its objectives by delivering initiatives that track, detect, and mitigate risks to the terrestrial animal resource base. This sub-program supports food safety, public health, and protection of the animal resource base, and instils national and international confidence in Canadian agricultural products. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports domestic and international confidence that Canada's animals are free from certain reportable diseases, particularly those potentially transmissible to humans.

Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program – Terrestrial Animal Health
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
106,024,307 105,541,039 (483,268)
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program – Terrestrial Animal Health
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
862 821 (41)
Table 2-2b: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Terrestrial Animal Health
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Federally registered veterinary biologics establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered veterinary biologics establishments in compliance with federal regulations 90% 100% Met
Veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations Percentage of tested veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations 100% 100% Met
Animals in Canada are transported humanely Percentage of inspected live loads in compliance with humane transport standards 100% 100% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Updating the Health of Animals Regulations

In 2013-14, Health of Animals Regulations were amended with respect to traceability. Traceability amendments with respect to swine are scheduled to come into force in July 2014.

In the fall of 2013, the CFIA held consultations with key stakeholders with respect to animal transport. Subsequent amendments have been drafted to update regulations on animal transportation. These amendments will maintain market access to major trading partners, better reflect current science, and improve the well-being of animals during transportation. These amendments are anticipated to come into force in early 2016.

Continuing the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) program

In 2013-14, the CFIA evaluated the BSE Management Program Endnote xxi and identified areas for improvement. The evaluation noted the Program's success, impact and results achieved, as well as its continued relevance. Findings supported the Agency's request for continued BSE funding.

Through Economic Action Plan 2014, the government approved an additional $205.5 million over five years to renew the BSE program. BSE has been a reportable disease in Canada since 1990 and BSE program activities are necessary to protect human and animal health and to reduce any potential negative economic and trade impacts. In 2013-14, in support of the BSE program, the CFIA:

  • conducted a costing exercise to look for efficiencies;
  • reviewed IM/IT requirements to enhance effective data capturing;
  • committed to improving BSE training; and,
  • worked with AAFC, CBSA, HC, PHAC, provinces, and industry to restart the development of a BSE Roadmap, a tool to communicate Canada's long-term BSE management approach.

The CFIA also continued to update its manuals of procedure, hazard specific plans, guidance documents for industry and other communications to enhance effective preparedness to prevent, control and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases.

Enhancing systems to manage animal health and food safety issues, and to maximise market access

In 2013-14, to enhance the traceability system and improve the ability to manage animal health issues, the CFIA enhanced its geographic information system capability and signed two additional livestock traceability data sharing agreements with provinces. As a result of data sharing agreements between the CFIA and Prairie provinces and Prince Edward Island, the CFIA has worked collaboratively with provincial partners and private sector stakeholders to launch the Traceability National Information Portal (TNIP). The Portal provides single-window access to traceability information. Successfully implemented in the fall of 2013, the CFIA continues to further enhance TNIP's information management systems and participates on a steering committee to establish the Canadian Agri-Traceability Services (CATS) so as to increase traceability at the national level. This initiative will improve the CFIA's service delivery and enable regulators at all levels to make informed decisions to effectively manage animal health issues, such as disease events and outbreaks.

To allow for more transparency and better strategic planning, the Agency developed a draft Surveillance Framework in November 2013, profiling the CFIA's animal health surveillance function. The Framework should launch broader discussions on animal health surveillance with respect to policy and program decision making and field operations and ensuring capacity is available to respond to animal health issues.

2.1.2.2 Sub-Program: Aquatic Animal Health

The Aquatic Animal Health sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with the introduction and spread of certain aquatic animal diseases of concern to Canada. This program achieves its objectives by partnering with Fisheries and Oceans Canada to deliver on initiatives that track, detect and control aquatic animal diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports domestic and international confidence that Canada's aquatic animal resources are free from aquatic animal diseases, and contributes to the sustainable productivity of aquaculture and harvest fisheries.

Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program- Aquatic Animal Health
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
5,606,323 61,533,586 55,927,263
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program – Aquatic Animal Health
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
59 43 (16)

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $55.9 million is predominantly due to the significant increase in statutory compensation payments, in accordance with the Health of Animals Act. The decrease of 16 FTEs from Planned to Actual mainly relates to the application of reductions stemming from savings initiatives.

Table 2-2c: Summary of Performance by Program: Aquatic Animal Health
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Domestic aquatic animals and their products are compliant with Canadian regulations and meet the standards of international agreements Percentage of certified aquatic animal and aquatic animal product shipments that meet the receiving country's import requirements 99% 100% Met
Risks to the Canadian aquatic animal resource base are mitigated Number of reportable aquatic animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 0 Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Improving service delivery and finding efficiencies

Over 2013-14, the CFIA realigned its approach to the Aquatics Animal Health Program by:

  • strengthening program compartmentalization and biosecurity measures;
  • reducing testing and inspection costs; and
  • achieving more efficient ways to implement import controls.

The CFIA also explored opportunities for alternative service delivery with approved private and provincial laboratories and continued to implement the Domestic Movement Control Program for aquatic animals.

Meeting international standards to maintain market access

To continue to improve domestic aquatic animal and product compliance with Canadian legal requirements and international agreements standards, the CFIA continued developing the National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP). This involved a phased-in implementation of import controls for aquatic animals under the Health of Animals Regulations. Additionally, export certificates for aquatic animals were negotiated with Canada's largest trade partners. In 2013-14, 20 new import permits were negotiated with several countries including those in the European Union, South America and South-East Asia.

2.1.2.3 Sub-Program: Feed

The Feed sub-program aims to minimize risks associated with livestock and poultry feeds manufactured in or imported into Canada. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that feeds are safe, effective and labelled in accordance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program contributes to the production and maintenance of a healthy and sustainable animal resource base which supports food safety and environmental sustainability. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports confidence in feed manufactured in Canada.

Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program- Feed
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
20,368,794 20,864,640 495,846
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program – Feed
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
207 210 3
Table 2-2d: Summary of Performance by Program: Feed
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Feed establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed establishments in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, not including labelling tasks 95% 97% Met
Feed labels meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed facilities in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, when assessed against inspection tasks associated with labelling 95% 95% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Renewing feed regulations

In 2013-14, the Agency led the Feed Regulatory Renewal by drafting proposals to amend the regulations for feed ingredient assessment and authorization as well as feed labeling, and releasing them for public comment in October 2013. Additionally, consultations with key stakeholders were conducted in the second half of 2013-14 for the feed hazard identification and preventative controls module. A number of policy questions have been identified and the Agency is examining their potential impact on feed regulatory modernization and broader Agency Transformation initiatives. As well, the CFIA consulted with stakeholders to update user fees under the livestock feed program.

Strengthening planning and prioritization to improve inspections and reduce risks to Canadians' health

In 2013-14, the CFIA reviewed all inspection data related to feed ban tasks available for high-risk commercial feed mills and followed up where concerns around delivery were identified, which aligned with recommendations made in the CFIA's Evaluation of the Enhanced Feed Ban Endnote xxii. To improve efficiency and effectiveness, the Agency modified feed facility inspection frequencies so as to support the enhanced Feed Ban program (an important component of the BSE program) and efficient and effective delivery of the Feed Ban program.

2.1.3 Plant Resources Program

The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instils confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Plant Resources Program

2013-14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Total Authorities Available for use 2013–14 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
84,260,734 84,692,441 90,803,236 86,537,966 1,845,525

Human Resources (FTEs) – Plant Resources Program

2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
856 809 (47)

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $1.8 million is due to: an increase in efforts to control the Asian Long-Horned Beetle; the transfer of resources from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, as part of a multi-year Memorandum of Understanding to continue the Growing Forward 2 policy framework; and, expenditures made on behalf of the Treasury Board (such as parental and maternity allowances, entitlements on cessation of service, etc.). The decrease of 47 FTEs from Planned to Actual mainly relates to the application of reductions related to savings initiatives.

Table 2-3a: Summary of Performance by Program Level: Plant Resources Program

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated Number of regulated foreign plant pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselves 0 0 Met
Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements 90% 92% Met
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk- mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of confirmed introductions of quarantine pests for which notices are issued 100% 100% Met
Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner 90% 100% Met
Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained Percentage of certified plants and plant products shipment (lots) that meet the country of destination phytosanitary import requirements 99% 99% Met

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The performance for domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements was exceeded due to:

  • applicants and field managers were well educated about program requirements;
  • good communication between the CFIA and applicants; and
  • no extreme weather patterns during the growing season.

Close working relationship between Agency units, professionalism and good internal communication were responsible for the increased performance in the issuing of notices in a timely manner.

Continuing to modernize plant regulations and inspection activities

The CFIA continued to modernize its regulations related to seeds and plant breeder's rights, and inspection activities by making them more risk and outcome-based to provide greater flexibility, such as providing a more modern intellectual property framework for Plant Breeders that encourages increased investment, and decreasing red tape for the regulated sector.

Initiatives to control pests

The Asian Long-horned Beetle (ALHB), previously declared eradicated from the regulated area in Toronto and Vaughan, was detected in August 2013 in a separate, previously unregulated, industrial area near Pearson International Airport in Mississauga, Ontario. The CFIA established a new quarantine area and is undertaking control measures in concert with other federal, provincial, and municipal counterparts.

Through the Beyond the Border (BtB) and Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) the CFIA focused on plant-related issues to:

  • prevent the introduction into Canada of the Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM), a particularly destructive invasive species, by implementing a Canada-US AGM working group and coordinating assessments of countries regulated for AGM. Other countries, such as Mexico and New Zealand, were engaged in an expanded AGM certification program.
  • conduct a feasibility study on the Harmonization of Wood Packaging Materials, a pilot aimed at advancing a North American Perimeter Approach (NAPA) to inspecting off-continent wood packaging at the first point of arrival. Pests that might be hidden in wood packaging material would be detected before having a chance to reach the Canadian environment.
  • continue NAPA pilots to coordinate regulatory oversight approaches of Chrysanthemum White Rust (CWR) and streamlining commodity certification processes for the Greenhouse Certification Program (GCP).
  • with its U.S. counterpart, the Agency developed a draft Memorandum of Understanding to establish a framework for ongoing cooperation on plant health issues of mutual concern.

2.1.3.1 Sub-Program: Plant Protection

The Plant Protection sub-program aims to mitigate the risks associated with the introduction and spread of plant pests of quarantine significance to Canada. This sub-program achieves its objectives by delivering initiatives that track, detect and control, or eradicate regulated plant pests and diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. The program verifies that plants and plant products, and their associated risk pathways, meet phytosanitary requirements. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports environmental sustainability, and public health and instils confidence in Canada's plants and plant products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program- Plant Protection
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
67,636,012 69,187,066 1,551,054
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program – Plant Protection
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
665 626 (39)
Table 2-3b: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Plant Protection
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Pre-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of inspected shipments from off-shore system approaches or pre-clearance programs in compliance with federal regulations 85% 99% Met
At-Border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of pre-arrival documentation in compliance with Canadian import requirements 90% 99% Met
Post-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of new pest detections that have a science based management plan initiated within one year 90% N/A
No new pest detections
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Percentage of inspected shipments from off-shore system approaches or pre-clearance programs in compliance with federal regulations:

The high compliance rate indicates that the investment in communication of Canadian requirements to foreign countries and the investment of resources in developing and auditing the systems-based programs in the countries of origin are yielding a high rate of compliance with Canadian requirements.

Percentage of pre-arrival documentation in compliance with Canadian import requirements:

The higher performance indicates foreign countries and importers have a strong understanding of Canadian requirements and, in cases where minor deficiencies are identified, they are able to readily address the deficiencies in order to permit the import of their plant or plant product shipment.

Plant Protection

In 2013-14, the CFIA continued to deliver the Plum Pox Management and Monitoring Program (PPMMP) through the completion of surveys and monitoring activities. The Plum Pox Virus (PPV) is a plant disease that drastically reduces yields of stone fruit. The CFIA detected PPV in the remaining quarantine area in Ontario. As a result, the western border of the quarantine area was expanded by 800 metres and survey activities will continue in 2014-15. Additionally, the CFIA continued creating a baseline of genetic data to help identify new strains of the PPV.

The CFIA continued implementing its Invasive Plants Directive, which describes the CFIA's invasive plants policy and provides a list of pest plants that are prohibited in Canada. The directive aims to control the importation and the domestic movement of pest plants in Canada. In the implementation, the Agency collaborated with domestic and international stakeholders, such as provinces and Invasive Species Councils and international partners through the WTO notification process. The Agency also collaborated with provincial partners on response options for woolly cupgrass (WCG) – an invasive plant that competes with crops, especially corn and soybeans, reducing their yield – and options for control of kudzu – an invasive plant that reduces biodiversity and causes significant productivity losses to the agriculture and forestry sectors. As well, the CFIA implemented regulatory control of other invasive plants such as jointed goatgrass in Ontario.

The Agency supported the provincial government and industry's implementation of farm level biosecurity for potato and grains and oilseeds through the development, distribution and web posting of standards, producer guides and communication tools for producers. The implementation of effective biosecurity measures across commodities supports the prevention of introduction and spread of pests, contributing to a healthy and sustainable plant resource and safe-guarding the health and well-being of Canadians, the environment and the economy.

2.1.3.2 Sub-Program: Seed

The Seed sub-program aims to ensure that seeds sold in Canada meet established standards, that seeds are properly represented in the marketplace and that most agricultural crop kinds are registered before entering the marketplace. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that seeds meet quality, biosafety, labelling and registration standards as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Regulating the environmental release of plants with novel traits contributes to environmental sustainability and the health and safety of Canadians. Furthermore, quality assured and accurately labelled seeds contribute to a prosperous agricultural production system and to domestic and international confidence in Canada's seeds.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program: Seed
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
11,895,131 12,100,495 205,364
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program: Seed
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
131 132 1
Table 2-3c: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Seed
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic pedigreed seed lots in compliance with federal regulations 95% 95% Met
Percentage of authorized confined releases of Plants with Novel Traits (PNTs) into the Canadian environment that are in compliance with the authorized conditions 90% 91% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Agency continued to prepare for the Alternative Service Delivery (ASD) transition of seed crop inspection to the private sector, beginning in the 2014 crop season. In 2013-14, the CFIA trained and evaluated over 170 private sector inspectors, resulting in more than 140 being issued licences. In addition, 24 entities were licensed as Authorized Seed Crop Inspection Services following review and evaluation of their quality management system manuals.

In anticipation of regulatory updates, the CFIA has been encouraging Seed Potato producers to voluntarily adhere to the Seed Potato Tuber Quality Management Program (SPTQMP). As a result, more than 130 growers have signed up voluntarily in 2013-14 and the CFIA will be exploring alternative approaches with stakeholders to facilitate seed potato movement both domestically and to the United States. The goal of the SPTQMP is to adjust to industry practices, facilitate timely delivery of seed potatoes during a very short timeframe domestically, and make efficient use of CFIA resources, while maintaining credibility and compliance to existing standards. The United States does not consider the SPTQMP as meeting their import requirements and the Agency will continue to explore other ASD approaches to meet U.S. import requirements and expectations.

In keeping with efforts to increase innovation and productivity in Canadian agriculture, the CFIA, along with AAFC and the Canadian Grain Commission, engaged stakeholders to review the crop variety registration system and its effects on the development and adoption of new varieties. This review is consistent with the government's focus on innovation, competitiveness, market development, and regulatory modernization to generate economic growth across the sector.

2.1.3.3 Sub-Program: Fertilizer

The Fertilizer sub-program aims to ensure that regulated fertilizer, fertilizer/pesticides and supplement products sold in Canada are properly labelled, effective and safe for humans, plants, animals, and the environment. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that all fertilizers and supplements meet the standards for safety and efficacy as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Through verification of compliance, the program contributes to public health and environmental sustainability and supports domestic and international confidence in fertilizers manufactured in Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program- Fertilizer
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
4,188,631 4,260,946 72,315
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program – Fertilizer
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
49 43 (6)
Table 2-3d: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Fertilizer
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected fertilizer and supplement products in compliance with federal regulations (Fertilizers Regulations) 90% 92% Met
Percentage of submissions reviewed within the prescribed service delivery standards 90% 90% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Changes to Fertilizers Regulations

In April 2013, requirements for fertilizer and supplement efficacy and quality were removed from the Fertilizers Regulations, and the Fertilizer Program was changed accordingly. This included discontinuing pre-market efficacy assessments, verification of performance claims, and market place monitoring for quality. Regulated products are still required to be safe and properly labelled.

These changes facilitate Canadian producers' access to innovative agricultural inputs and open the door to more complex product formulations with multiple active ingredients for which applicants have not been able to demonstrate efficacy. The CFIA is receiving more applications for this type of product. As safety assessments of complex formulations are more demanding and take longer to complete, this may impact the Fertilizer Program's ability to meet service delivery standards. The CFIA is monitoring this trend to help to allow for a timely product review.

In addition to the changes implemented in 2013, the Fertilizer Program continues to modernize its regulatory and policy frameworks as part of the CFIA's regulatory modernization strategy. This initiative takes a risk-based approach by exempting from registration additional products that are deemed safe and have a well-established history of use. It also streamlines the CFIA registration process, creates greater flexibility and lessens red tape for regulated parties. The initiative is targeted for completion in 2015. Modernization efforts support the response to the Agency's evaluation of the Fertilizer Program Endnote xxiii, with a strong emphasis on pro-active risk identification and integration in program design and delivery.

2.1.3.4 Sub-Program: Intellectual Property Rights

The Intellectual Property Rights sub-program, by which plant breeders can obtain intellectual property rights for their new plant varieties, aims to create an environment in Canada which supports innovation in plant breeding, as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program achieves its objectives by assessing applications from plant breeders to determine that new plant varieties meet the criteria for protection, and when all requirements have been met, granting rights to the variety breeder/owner for a period of up to 18 years. The owner of a new variety who receives a grant of rights has exclusive rights over use of the variety, and will be able to protect his/her new variety from exploitation by others. By enforcing the relevant governing acts and regulations, this sub-program stimulates plant breeding in Canada, facilitates better access to foreign varieties for Canadian producers and supports the protection of Canadian varieties in other countries.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program- Intellectual Property Rights
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
972,667 989,460 16,793
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program – Intellectual Property Rights
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
10 8 (2)
Table 2-3e: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Intellectual Property Rights
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Plant breeders develop new varieties for the Canadian market Percentage of Plant Breeders' Rights applications that reach approval and are granted rights 100% 100% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the 2013 calendar year, the CFIA approved 322 applications for Plant Breeders' Rights (PBR), and 236 approved applications were granted PBR. More information on PBR can be found on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website Endnote xxiv.

Modernizing Plant Breeders' Rights

To strengthen breeders' rights in Canada, the CFIA continues to modernize the PBR program by updating the intellectual property framework, encouraging increased investment in and innovation of plant breeding. The CFIA completed the first phase of PBR modernization by tabling proposed amendments under Bill C-18, the Agricultural Growth Act. The CFIA has conducted 14 outreach sessions with various stakeholder organizations and will continue consultations in the summer of 2014. The CFIA will begin the second phase of PBR modernization, focusing on improving program efficiency and effectiveness.

2.1.4 International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals and plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives through actively participating in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system with foreign trading partners and negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access.

Based on market demand, the CFIA will also continue to negotiate and certify against export conditions in order to access export markets. The Agency, working with industry and interested stakeholders, will continue to develop and maintain export certification standards (which vary from country to country and commodity to commodity), conduct inspections and issue export certificates.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

2013-14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Total Authorities Available for use 2013–14 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
31,697,693 31,697,647 37,154,661 35,004,557 3,306,910

Human Resources (FTEs) – International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
338 343 5

The increase between Planned Spending and Actual Spending of $3.3 million and 5 FTEs are related to Agency investments in international engagement and standard setting primarily in relation to food, and expenditures made on behalf of the Treasury Board (such as parental and maternity allowances, entitlements on cessation of service, etc.). In addition, the Agency made a concerted effort to improve the alignment of program expenditures and FTEs. As such, a portion of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Actual Spending was aligned to the International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Program, while all BSE Planned Spending was aligned to the Animal Health Program, contributing to the increase in Actual Spending over Planned Spending for the International Collaboration and Technical Agreement Program.

Table 2-4a: Summary of Performance by Program: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance Status
Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interests 24 40 Met
International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants, and their products Number of unjustified non- tariff barriers resolved 24 Footnote 11 50 Met
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of senior level CFIA- led committees with foreign regulatory counterparts 5 6 Met
Number of CFIA-led technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments 6 Footnote 12 9 Met

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies (ISSB) meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interests:

A category of meetings was inadvertently not forecast and ISSBs organized additional meetings that were not anticipated when the CFIA made its forecast for the RPP. Both factors contributed to the performance for this indicator far exceeding the planned target.

Number of unjustified non- tariff barriers resolved:

The CFIA exceeded the target set in 2013-14 because the Government of Canada's Global Commerce Strategy required that the Agency undertake a higher number of market access activities than had been planned.

Number of CFIA-led technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments:

The delivery of a technical assistance activity by the CFIA is a demand driven response to a request from a foreign government that is assessed through an internal CFIA governance process on a case by case basis. In 2013-14, the CFIA identified and successfully delivered nine requests, surpassing the planned target of six.

International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

During 2013-14, the CFIA continued to engage international regulatory counterparts to support efforts to identify best practices in food safety, animal, and plant health regulatory approaches, advance resolution of potential issues and promote science-based approaches. For example, the CFIA:

  • continued discussions with China to advance collaboration on and resolution of food safety, animal health and plant health issues;
  • fostered further collaboration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on modernizing food safety systems; and
  • hosted the Canada-European Union Veterinary Joint Management Committee to advance technical discussions on joint food safety and animal health objectives.
Advancing the Beyond the Border and Regulatory Cooperation Council initiatives with the U.S.

The CFIA continued implementation of the initiatives by working with industry stakeholders and U.S. counterparts to:

  • develop procedures to share information for joint assessments on food safety, plant health and animal health risks;
  • initiate pilots to create a common approach to meat cut nomenclature systems and to reduce quality related inspections for the import of U.S. onions;
  • draft a framework to implement the previously signed arrangement for mutual recognition of zoning decisions;
  • undertake stakeholder consultations on a Framework for the Perimeter Approach to Plant Protection; and
  • commence in-country food (non-meat) safety systems recognition assessments, with the intent to determine the comparability of the Canadian and U.S. systems.
Advancing food, animal health, and plant protection agenda multilaterally

As Canada's lead for the domestic implementation of the World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) Measures, the CFIA led and continued to coordinate Canada's SPS input into various WTO fora such as the Negotiating Group on Trade Facilitation.

Similarly, the CFIA led Canada's participation at the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC), the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE); and in certain committees of the Codex Alimentarius Commission to promote the development of international science-based standards consistent with Canada's regulatory framework.

Furthermore, the CFIA collaborated on a new Strategic Plan at the North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO), an IPPC regional body that develops regional phytosanitary standards to enable the trade of plants and plant products between Canada, the U.S. and Mexico.

Furthermore, the CFIA continued to work with AAFC in raising awareness about and developing global solutions with respect to low level presence (LLP) of genetically modified (GM) crops in international trade. LLP refers to the unintended presence, at low levels, of minute amounts of GM material that has been approved in at least one country but not in the country that is importing the product. Over the past year, we have collaborated with AAFC to build awareness of the issue of LLP on an international level, including exchanging information on how countries manage LLP and developing a common understanding of the trade risks posed by LLP.

Fulfilling Canada's obligations under various international treaties

In 2013-14, the CFIA continued to fulfill Canada's obligations under the Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Seed Schemes, the Association of Official Seed Certifying Agencies (AOSCA), the International Seed Testing Association (ISTA), the Association of Official Seed Analysts (AOSA) and the Association of American Seed Control Officials (AASCO).

Supporting bilateral and multilateral trade negotiations

Working closely with the Department of Foreign Affairs Trade and Development Canada (DFATD), the CFIA continued to co-lead the SPS components of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations, the Canada-India Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) and the Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) negotiations. The CFIA also contributed to the development of positions and strategies for free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations for all SPS chapters as well as other chapters that affect the Agency's mandate.

2.1.5 Internal Services

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Internal Service

2013-14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Total Authorities Available for use 2013–14 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
128,153,885 130,281,252 137,563,698 131,959,340 1,678,088

Human Resources (FTEs) – Internal Service

2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
898 856 (42)

The increase between Planned and Actual Spending of $1.7 million is primarily related to expenditures made on behalf of the Treasury Board (such as parental and maternity allowances, entitlements on cessation of service, etc.) and collective bargaining settlement payments negotiated in the 2013-14 fiscal year. The decrease of 42 FTEs from Planned to Actual primarily relates to the application of reductions stemming from savings initiatives. In addition, the Agency made a concerted effort to improve the alignment of program expenditures and FTEs to the applicable programs.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Enhancing the Agency's stewardship

The Agency continued to implement an Agency-wide stewardship approach, including:

  • project management improvement through the development of a refined project management policy framework and making available project management training, coaching and mentoring.
  • strategic procurement enhancement by linking procurement planning to projects and program planning. Branch procurement plans were completed for all branches and are used to inform on strategic procurement opportunities, establish priorities, and determine resource needs.
  • developed and is communicating the CFIA's Real Property Management Framework to stakeholders to support timely and informed real property management decisions and their relationship with the strategic outcome of programs.
Leveraging government-wide initiatives to improve information management and information systems

The CFIA made progress in the area of information and record management by exploring modern information management and collaborative solutions, while continuing to maintain and enhance its existing foundation. More specifically, the Agency:

  • partnered with Library and Archives Canada , to improve its paper holdings archives;
  • implemented TBS's Standard on Email Management and Record Keeping policies;
  • initiated, as part of Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) Record Keeping compliance, a number of activities related to information assets, including:
    • revision of the file classification plan to a function based system;
    • identification and completion of an inventory of records; and
    • revisions to the file retention plan to revisit the schedules for retention.
  • explored software options for collaborative solutions, which will complement the existing information systems widely used by staff as standard repositories, so as to better manage information assets and fulfill the growing need for timely, consistent, accessible, and trusted information.
  • as part of Open Government, implemented ATIP By-Online, which allows for access to information and privacy (ATIP) requests for CFIA information to be done online.
Risk Management

An All Hazard Risk Assessment (AHRA) was completed targeting 46 identified risks covering naturally occurring hazards i.e. biological, meteorological, and geographical and human induced events. The AHRA covers unintentional and intentional events as well as risks identified in the CFIA's Security Plan. This information was a key requirement for inclusion in the Agency's Strategic Emergency Management Plan (SEMP).

Focusing on people

The CFIA implemented its new Conflict of Interest (CoI), Post-Employment Policy and related Standard Operating Procedures and new online submission form. A comprehensive Values and Ethics in-class training course with emphasis on CoI was delivered in the National Capital Region, and the Atlantic, Quebec and Western Areas. The Agency also launched its first Ethical Climate Survey to help identify the CFIA's ethical climate and culture. An in-depth analysis of the results is underway.

The CFIA Office of the Staffing Ombudsman, dedicated to addressing staffing complaints, went operational in 2013.

The Agency streamlined human resources (HR) service delivery for managers and employees by implementing a multi-channel HR contact centre (phone, email, and mail). Efficiency and effectiveness in the delivery of HR services have increased and the HR contact centre has completed over 117,000 transactions. Furthermore, 1-888 HR already handles various processes, including the departure process and Long Term Service Awards for the NCR and Atlantic.

Maintaining citizen-focused service delivery

The CFIA's Complaints and Appeals Office, created in April 2012 to support the Agency's commitment to improve service delivery for stakeholders, published its first Annual Report on the Agency's website Endnote xxv and shared with national associations in January 2014.

The Agency continued to increase transparency and provide Canadians with useful and timely information about the work the CFIA does and how it is done. The Agency has strived to make information more widely available to Canadians and other stakeholders by:

  • actively participating in the Consumer Association Roundtable (CAR) to receive input and provide clarification on various CFIA initiatives;
  • improving the Agency's website to provide easier access to, and clearer information to Canadians, in areas such as food recalls, allergy alerts, and enforcement data;
  • enhancing the ability for Canadians to report animal and aquatic animal diseases to the CFIA;
  • launching the industry labelling tool;
  • developing the Agency's 2013-2015 Social Media Strategy for Official Communications;
  • creating the CFIA's Facebook page; and
  • providing specific enforcement data (prosecution bulletins, suspended and cancelled organic certifications, and quarterly reports of non-compliant and disposed food products, refused shipments, Administrative Monetary Penalties, and license suspensions and cancellations)
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